Update: win a copy of Rafa’s book!

Rafael Nadal's book: Rafa

A gladiator on court, Rafael Nadal is widely known to be an intensely competitive, ambitious tennis player. Off court, he is an immensely private person. A natural athlete, he was exposed to sports at a young age (his uncle, Miguel Ángel Nadal, is a former Barcelona FC player), played competitive tennis and participated in an organized soccer league. But it wasn’t until he was 13 that he knew tennis was in his future.

In his first-ever memoir, RAFA, written with award-winning journalist John Carlin, Nadal reveals the secrets of his game and shares the inspiring personal story behind his success.
The book covers Nadal’s childhood, growth as a player, and his remarkable career. It includes the highs, such as winning the Wimbledon 2008 final in what John McEnroe called “the greatest game of tennis ever played,” to the lows, when in 2009 knee injuries and family troubles caused Nadal to exit the French Open early and miss Wimbledon altogether.
The book also details the 2010 US Open, where he completed a career Grand Slam.

The book is out out August 23rd, 2011, and you’ll get a chance to win one copy on Tennis Buzz!

More infos about the give away soon.

The Museum holds personal collections of equipment, dress and archive material relating to Wimbledon champions, pioneer players and stars of the court from each generation. This collection is continually updated with new material from competitors on the current professional circuit.

If you enjoy tennis, history of tennis and want to know more about Wimbledon behind the scenes, a visit to the Wimbledon Museum is a must-do. You can also take a Wimbledon guided tour, read my recap here.

A few pics of the player memorabilia collection.

Wimbledon Museum

Outfit worn by Bjorn Borg when he won his fifth consecutive Wimbledon victory in 1980: close-fitting Fila shirt, short shorts, headband, wristband, socks and Diadora shoes.

Wimbledon Museum

Wimbledon Museum
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Right after his semifinal win against Tsonga at the 2010 Australian Open, Federer had joked that Britain had been searching for a male Grand Slam champion for about 150,000 years. In fact it’s “only” 75 years: Fred Perry was the last to win a Slam in 1936 (he won Wimbledon and US Open that year).

Fred Perry statue at Wimbledon:

Fred Perry statue

The last British woman to win a Slam is Virginia Wade: Wimbledon in 1977. Not only was 1977 the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Wimbledon Championships, but it was also the 25th year of the reign (the Silver Jubilee) of Queen Elizabeth II.

Virginia Wade was born July 10, 1945 in Bournemouth, England, where her father was vicar of Holy Trinity Church. The family moved to South Africa in 1946, before Virginia was 1. After finding a racquet while cleaning out a closet at age 9, she played tennis “every single minute I wasn’t obliged to do something else.”
When Virginia was 15 the family moved back to England. By age 16 Virginia was considered the most promising junior player in England, and she qualified to play in the Championships at Wimbledon. She continued to play at Wimbledon every year through 1987–26 years in all.
Virginia won 55 pro singles titles, including 3 Grand Slam tourneys (1968 US Open, 1972 Australian Open, 1977 Wimbledon).
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Andy Murray

Andy Murray

Andy Murray

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Lindsay Davenport

Lindsay Davenport

Lindsay Davenport

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