#TennisAid Uganda day 2

#TennisAid Uganda: the Shimoni Primary School

We left at 8am to be on time at the Shimoni Primary School. Classes started at 10 but we had about 45 minutes by foot and then had to prepare the nets, the marks, since the court was a football field.

The first lesson was on Sunday afternoon, but this time it was on Monday morning, so there was a lot of traffic and cars, thousand of bus and boda-boda, motorbikes carrying people for 1 dollar. All this made this walking down the street (no sidewalks) an indescribable experience.

We arrived at the school and discovered that the field was occupied, a football team was training there. Our friends took us to tour the facility, we were introduced to the sports manager and to the school director who – like the day before at the Ntinda school – asked us to sign the visitors book, and put our names, address and a comment on our visit.

We started the class and divided the group into 2 groups: 18 kids worked with Abel and 24 with me. Both groups warmed up and then worked in small groups. The ease, speed and discipline they showed in each activity kept surprising me.

I keep thinking about the huge amount of times we tell our students again and again how to do certain things that should be automations, but these kids just needed ONE indication and obedience was absolute and instantaneous.

#TennisAid Uganda day 2

I keep thinking about the huge amount of times we tell our students again and again how to do certain things that should be automations, but these kids just needed ONE indication and obedience was absolute and instantaneous.

The class was scheduled for a 3 hour session, but we said that was too long for the kids. Coaches told us that these kids so enjoy playing that it would be actually too short. After an hour of play, some asked for permission to eat something, while the others who had no food kept playing on their own.
Less than 3 minutes after, almost all the kids were back with racquet in hand as they considered that stopping to eat was just a waste of time. For 3 hours we shared exercises, games, jokes, photos and we would have wanted to give more of our time and effort.

We proceeded to deliver the clothes we brought as gifts. It was without a doubt the strongest moment of the day. The joy, gratitude and hugs of children were so exciting that it was really difficult to hold back tears. And then, to top it off, one of the girls asked to speak in front of everyone, we ordered silence and she said:

“Thanks coaches for these gifts. We are very grateful. I would also say: when a teacher teaches something you have to pay attention. Because if you don’t, you don’t learn. That’s what I mean.”

Simple and exciting. Even now, I remember it and my eyes are filled with tears.

After the farewell, we undertake our 45 minutes walk, which we do in silence. Not because we were tired but to assimilate all we had lived and felt that day, and we were really touched.
We returned home really late, almost midnight. I went to bed at 1, while Abel edited videos until 4am.

Also read:
#TennisAid Uganda: the story of Martin Rocca
#TennisAid Uganda: the project
#TennisAid Uganda: the funding
#TennisAid: the arrival in Uganda
#TennisAid Uganda: the Ntinda School for the Deaf

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