What a difference a year makes: last year, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal pulled out of the tournament, whereas Novak Djokovic crashed out in his first match, losing to Sam Querrey in the second round.
This year for the first time, the Bercy quarter-finalists are the eight men qualified for the ATP World Tour Finals in London.
I’ve had tickets for the day session and get to watch Djokovic-Wawrinka and Federer-Del Potro. Here’s a quick recap:

Djokovic vs Wawrinka

6-1 6-4 for Djokovic. The score is flattering for the Serb but doesn’t really reflect the match.
Wawrinka fought a lot and had a lot of opportunities to break Djokovic’s serve but the world number 2 was simply more consistant.

Pics of the match.

Federer vs Del Potro

Roger Federer has had one of his worst season ever in 2013, but he seems to have found his form back of late. And indeed, for a set and a half, Federer looked like his old self: effective on serve, aggressive on return, with a will to finish the points at the net. 6-3 for Federer.
First break points for Del Potro at 5-4 in the second set and the Argentinian levels the match.
Both players exchange beaks of serve at the start of the third set but the 17-time Grand Slam winner goes for his shots and has the last word: 6-4 3-6 6-3 for the Swiss.

Pics and videos of the match.

Nadal vs Gasquet

Finalist in 2007 (loss to Nalbandian), Nadal hasn’t made the trip to the end-of-year Paris tournament in four years. But this year, with the world number one ranking at stake, he seems determined to do well at Bercy.
After two not so convincing victories over Marcel Granollers and Jerzy Janowicz, Rafa cruised past Richard Gasquet in straight sets 6-4 6-1.
Despite this loss (Gasquet is now 0-12 against Nadal), it was a good week for the Frenchman who qualified for the ATP Finals for the second time of his career.

Ferrer vs Berdych

As usual, the 2012 champion kind of flew under the radar, but David Ferrer overcame Tomas Berdych 4-6 7-5 6-3 to advance to the last four and set up an all-Spanish semi-final.

Earlier this year Tomas Berdych has signed a new apparel deal with Swedish fashion chain H&M. The current world number 7 thus became H&M’s first tennis brand ambassador.
As well as wearing H&M clothing on and off the court, he has worked with the company design team to develop its first-ever collection of tennis wear.
H&M launched its new Tomas Berdych Collection yesterday. The full collection is now available online.

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It’s time to wear white again. Check out some pics of the new HEAD White Bag collection, consisting of the HEAD White Monstercombi Tennis Racquet Bag and the 4 Majors Club Bag.

For every Grand Slam tournament the series introduces a new club bag in a bespoke design. As part of the White Series the first 4 Majors Club Bag, coloured in white with green striped shoulder straps, comes right in time for Wimbledon. The HEAD Club Bag collection will also feature different colours and designs for the upcoming US Open, the Australian Open and the French Open.

The new White Bag collection will be premiered at Wimbledon by Novak Djokovic, Andy Murray, Tomas Berdych, Gilles Simon and Richard Gasquet.

Novak Djokovic

Andy Murray

Tomas Berdych

The new HEAD White Bag collection is a limited edition and is available in-store at selected retailers now.

The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club:

Wimbledon guided tour – part 1
Wimbledon guided tour – part 2
Wimbledon Centre Court roof
Court 3 : a new Show Court at Wimbledon
Waiting in the Queue to Wimbledon
Wimbledon Museum: The Queue exhibition
The Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum: Player Memorabilia

Fashion and gear:

Rafael Nadal Nike outfit
Roger Federer Nike outfit
Maria Sharapova Nike dress
Serena Williams Nike dress
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga adidas outfit
Andy Murray adidas outfit
Ana Ivanovic adidas dress
Novak Djokovic Uniqlo outfit

Marketing

Wimbledon 2012 Sponsorship Activation

A trip down memory lane:

Wimbledon Trivia
Wimbledon past champions: stats and records
Wimbledon ‘s biggest upsets
Wimbledon memories: Mrs Blanche Bingley Hillyard
Wimbledon memories: Charlotte Cooper Sterry
Wimbledon memories: Dora Boothby
Wimbledon 1969: Laver’s getting beat by an Indian
Rod Laver – John Newcombe Wimbledon 1969
Bjorn Borg – Ilie Nastase Wimbledon 1976
Virginia Wade, Britain’s last Wimbledon champion
1981: First Wimbledon title for McEnroe
1982: Jimmy Connors defeats John McEnroe
1984: John McEnroe defeats Jimmy Connors
Wimbledon 1991: the first Middle Sunday
1992: first Grand Slam for Andre Agassi
1993: Pete Sampras defeats Jim Courier
2000 Wimbledon SF: Pat Rafter defeats Andre Agassi
2000 Wimbledon Final: Pete Sampras defeats Pat Rafter
2001 Wimbledon 4th round: Federer defeats Sampras
Wimbledon 2010: Rafael Nadal defeats Tomas Berdych
The Spirit of Wimbledon: a 4-part documentary by Rolex retracing Wimbledon history

Recap and analysis:

Polls:

Wimbledon 2013 champion?

  • Rafael Nadal (31%, 48 Votes)
  • Roger Federer (29%, 45 Votes)
  • Novak Djokovic (18%, 28 Votes)
  • Andy Murray (18%, 28 Votes)
  • Juan Martin Del Potro (1%, 2 Votes)
  • David Ferrer (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Tomas Berdych (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Other (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 154

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Wimbledon 2013 champion?

  • Serena Williams (56%, 78 Votes)
  • Maria Sharapova (19%, 26 Votes)
  • Victoria Azarenka (16%, 23 Votes)
  • Other (5%, 7 Votes)
  • Agnieszka Radwanska (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Petra Kvitova (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Li Na (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Angelique Kerber (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Sara Errani (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 140

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Rafael Nadal, Wimbledon 2010

From Rafael Nadal’s autobiography Rafa:

That diesel engine image Carlo Costa uses to describe me was especially appropriate in this tournament.
I started sluggishly, but once I got going, there was no stopping me. I nearly went out in the second round, squeaking through in five sets, but the further I advanced and the tougher the opponents were the more my game improved.

I beat Soderling in the quarterfinals in four sets and Andy Murray in the semis in three. In the match against Murray the Centre Court behaved impeccably. The British have been longing to have their own Wimbledon champion since 1936, when Fred Perry last won, and the crowd made it quite clear from the start where their allegiances lay. Murray, seeded four in the tournament, was the best hope they had had in a long time. Yet I felt they were entirely fair with me throughout, not cheering my double faults, clapping after my better shots. And when, to the disappointment of the great majority, I won in straight sets, they did not begrudge me a warm ound of applause.

I had expected that if I made it to the final, I’d be meeting Roger Federer for the fourth year running. I didn’t. My opponent this time was the number twelve seed Tomas Berdych, who’d had a brilliant run in the tournament, beating Federer in the quarters and Djokovic in the semifinals.
Though complacency was not on my mind, I was not nearly as nervous as I had been before the final two years earlier. Just as never having played a Wimbledon final before places you at a disavantage, the experience of having done so – in my case four times now- provides a soothing measure of familiarity. Playing an almost perfect game, I won in three sets, 6-3 7-5 6-4, to collect my second Wimbledon championship and eight Grand Slam.