A lot of changes at Roland Garros this year: a new stadium entrance, a new Place des Mousquetaires and a new 5,000 seat court, Court Simonne Mathieu … but still no roof, we’ll have to wait at least till next year. I’m eager to discover all these new features in a few weeks time!
In the mean time, check out our Roland Garros guides, relieve some of the biggest defeats and triumphs of the past, and of course share your pictures, videos and stories!

Roland Garros visitor’s guide:

A trip down memory lane:

1956: First time at Roland Garros for Rod Laver

1960-1969:
Portrait of Manuel Santana, first Spaniard to capture a Grand Slam title in 1961
1967: Françoise Durr defeats Lesley Turner
1969: Rod Laver defeats Ken Rosewall

1970-1979:
Portrait of 6-time Roland Garros champion Bjorn Borg
Portrait of Adriano Panatta, the only player to beat Bjorn Borg at Roland Garros
1978: Virginia Ruzici defeats Mima Jausovec
1978: Bjorn Borg defeats Guillermo Vilas
Roland Garros 1978 in pictures

1980-1989:
1982: At the request of Monsieur Wilander
1982: first Grand Slam for Mats Wilander
1983: Yannick Noah defeats Mats Wilander
1984 French Open: Ivan Lendl defeats John McEnroe
1985 French Open: Chris Evert defeats Martina Navratilova
Roland Garros 1985: Mats Wilander defeats Ivan Lendl
Roland Garros 1988: bold Leconte swept aside by a Mats for all surfaces
Portrait of Natasha Zvereva, 1988 runner-up
Portrait of Arantxa Sanchez, 1989 French Open champion
Portrait of Michael Chang, 1989 French Open champion

1990-1999:
1990 French Open: Opposites attract, Gomez defeats Agassi
Roland Garros 1990: Defending champion Sanchez loses in the first round
Roland Garros 1990: Edberg and Becker lose in the first round
1991 French Open 3RD: Michael Chang defeats Jimmy Connors
1991 French Open final: Jim Courier defeats Andre Agassi
1996: An unflinching Edberg causes a grand upset
Roland Garros 1996: Pete Sampras run through the semi-finals
1997: Going ga-ga over Guga
Steffi Graf – Martina Hingis Roland Garros 1999

2000-2009:
2000: Mary Pierce finds peace and glory
2004: Coria vs Gaudio: the egotist vs the underdog
2005: Rafael Nadal defeats Mariano Puerta
2006: Nadal defeats Federer, wins second Roland Garros title

2010-2018:
A look back at Roland Garros 2011
A look back at Roland Garros 2014
A look back at Roland Garros 2015
3 days at Roland Garros 2017: Rafa, Andy, Petra and more
Day 2 at Roland Garros 2018: Djokovic, Nadal and Wozniacki

Pictures and Recaps:

Fashion and gear:

Polls:

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Nadal, Madrid 2014


The ITF announced last summer a very controversial reform of the Davis Cup. Here’s all you need to know about the new format of the competition and how to buy tickets.

The competition

18 teams will take part to the Davis Cup finals from 18 to 24 November:
– last year’s 4 semi-finalists: Croatia, France, Spain and USA
– 2 wild cards: Great Britain and Argentina
– 12 winners of the qualifiers held in February

The 18 teams will compete in a group stage of six groups of three teams. The six group winners plus the two second-best teams with the best records based on sets won or games won will qualify for the quarter-finals.

Group A: France, Serbia, Japan
Group B: Croatia, Spain, Russia
Group C: Argentina, Germany, Chile
Group D: Belgium, Australia, Colombia
Group E: Great Britain, Kazakhstan, Netherlands
Group F: USA, Italy, Canada

The draw for the quarter-finals was also made:
1. Winner Group A vs Runner-up 1 or 2
2. Winner Group D vs Winner Group F
3. Winner Group E vs Winner Group C
4. Winner Group B vs Runner-up 1 or 2

The two teams with the worst record after the group stage phase of the finals will be relegated to Zone Group action the following year. The 12 teams that finish in 5th to 16th position will compete in the qualifiers next year.

Ties contested at the finals will consist of two singles matches and one doubles match, all played on one day, in the best of three sets. Matches will be played on hard courts.

The venue

Madrid Open Center Court - Caja Magica with retractable roof

The finals will be held at the Caja Mágica, home of the Madrid Masters since 2009. Made completely from iron, wood and glass, it was designed by French architect Dominique Perrault. The name Caja Mágica (Magic box) is due to the resemblance of the sports center with actual boxes, which are dynamic and ever changing.
It houses three tennis clay courts with retractable roofs. The main court, called Manolo Santana, can host 12.500 viewers. Courts 2 – Arantxa Sanchez Vicario stadium – and 3 are equipped with 3.500 and 2.500 seats respectively.

The tickets

Tickets will be on sale from April 9 on daviscupfinals.com. Ticket Box at the venue will open on November 14.

When purchasing an individual ticket, spectators will be able to see one whole tie between two nations, on the chosen court (2 singles and one doubles).

Tickets for the Group stage, played from 18 to 21 November, vary between €25 and €60. Prices vary between €40 and €95 for the quarter-finals, €50 and €120 for the semi-finals and €60 and €150 for the final.

Children between the ages of 0 and 5 do not need to pay a ticket to access the venue, but will need to sit on their parent’s lap. Children between the ages of 6 and 8 will have a special price, as will children between the ages of 9 and 12.

Photo credit: davijeans, JC

Roger Federer, Laver Cup 2018


The third edition of the Laver Cup will take place in Geneva, Switzerland, from 20 to 22 September 2019. Here’s all you need to know to buy tickets to this Europe vs rest of the World team competition.

The competition

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The competition pits 6 European players against 6 players from the rest of the world. Tennis legends Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe serve as captain, Thomas Enqvist and Patrick McEnroe as vice captains.
The event is played over 3 days: each day 4 matches are played, 3 singles and a doubles. Each win is worth one point on Friday, 2 on Saturday and 3 on Sunday. Matches are played in the best of 3 sets, with a 10-point match tiebreaker in the third.
The winning team must reach 13 points. In case of a tie, a doubles match is played as a regular set to determine the winner.

Created by Roger Federer‘s management company TEAM8, former Brazilian player Jorge Paulo Lemann and Tennis Australia, the Laver Cup is intended to be the Ryder Cup of tennis. But keep in mind, it is just – contrary to what Federer wants you to believe – a star-studded exhibition, with no sporting interest; a way to make easy money for the players, the occasion to watch the biggest stars of the game for the spectators.

The tickets

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Multi-session tickets

A multi-session ticket will give you access to all five sessions (over three days) at the Laver Cup: Friday: day and night sessions, Saturday: day and night sessions and Sunday: day session. The price of a multi-session ticket starts at CHF 250 (€220). Multi-session tickets go on sale on February 8, 2019 at 10am (CET) online via Ticketcorner or by phone at +41 0900 800 800.

The Laver Cup Insider Pre-Sale will occur on February 5 from 10am to 11:59pm CET. If you registered on the Laver Cup website, you will receive an email the morning of the pre-sale with a link to purchase tickets and a pre-sale code.

Single tickets

A limited number of single session tickets will go on sale online via Ticketcorner on Friday, May 3 at 10:00am CET. Prices range from CHF 25 (€22) to CHF 285 (€250) per ticket.
Single session tickets are only sold in pairs and are limited to one pair per customer.

If you registered on the website, you’ll have access to the Pre-Sale occuring on Thursday, May 2 from 10am to 11:59pm CET. You will receive an email with a link minutes before the pre-sale begins.

Hospitality packages

Hospitality packages are also available starting at CHF 2,600 (€2,300). More details on the official website.

Travel packages

The Laver Cup partnered with Steve Furgal’s International Tennis Tours and Faberg Tour Experience to propose Travel packages including multi-session tickets, hotel, dinners… More details on their website.

A few more things to know:
– there is a 6 ticket limit per purchaser
– there are no discounts for children
– wheelchair seats are only available for purchase via the Ticketcorner ticket hotline, +41 0900 800 800
– all tickets for Laver Cup 2019 will be in the form of a ‘Fan Ticket’. Customers will not have the option to print at home.

Photo credit: Christian Cresante

Read more:
Laver Cup 2018: Team Europe rules again

Wimbledon queue

Is the Queue the only way to buy Wimbledon tickets?

No. There are a few more options: four ways to get tickets: ballots, Ticketmaster, hospitality packages and debenture tickets. Read more here: How to get Wimbledon tickets, How to get last minute Wimbledon tickets.

Where is The Queue?

The easiest way to get to Wimbledon is by public transport, taking the District Line and getting off at Southfields station. It’s then a 10-minute walk to reach the Queue, here’s a map.

How much tickets are available for queuers?

– Centre Court: 500 tickets are available every day, for the first nine days, for queuers.
– No.1 Court: 500 tickets are available every day for queuers.
– No.2 Court: 500 tickets are available every day for queuers whilst matches are scheduled on this court.
– Ground Passes: thousands of tickets are available every day at the gate. These allow access to all of the outside courts, including the unreserved seating on Court No.3.

What time to queue?

It depends on how much of a tennis nuts you are, and how patient you are.

– 5 pm the day before: if you want to have a chance to get some Show Court tickets, you’ll have to camp overnight.
– 6 am on the day: if you would like to queue for Ground Passes, you should join the Queue a few hours before the Grounds open at 9.30am.
– 3 pm on the day: you can join the Queue later in the afternoon to gain late entry after 5pm at a cheaper rate

How do I know my place in the Queue?

On your arrival, the Stewards will direct you to the end of the Queue and give you a Queue card, that’s your official place in the Queue. Stewards will ckeck your card a few times before entering the grounds, don’t lose it!

Do I have to stay in the Queue all the time?

No. You can grab some food, have a toilet break… But you could lose your place is the Queue if you leave your place for more than 30 minutes. So, you can’t set up your tent, spend the night at your hotel and come back the morning after.

Can I queue for my friends?

No. Tickets are sold on a strictly one per person queueing basis and are non-transferable.

How is the overnight Queue organized?

The only way to get a Show Court ticket is to camp overnight. Everything is well organized and the Stewards are there to help and guide you. Stewards will wake you up around 6am and you’ll have to pack up your tent and belongings and take them to Left Luggage in order to create space for those joining the Queue on the day.
Around 7.30am the Stewards give wristbands to those towards the front of the Queue who are queueing for Centre, No.1 and No.2 Courts tickets. There are only 500 wristbands for each Show Court. That’s where your place in the Queue is important as the first 500 have priority for Centre Court, but some of the first 500 could choose to buy Court 1 tickets instead, so you could be 600 in the Queue and still be able to buy a Centre Court ticket.
Around 9.30am the Queue moves on and you can finally buy your ticket at the turnstile. The grounds open at 10.30am.

Is it secure to queue at night?

Yes. There are Stewards on both day and night shift to handle all problems. So, don’t worry and enjoy the experience.

Can I bring food and drink?

Yes. You can also order yourself a takeaway to be delivered to the Wimbledon Park Road Gate, grab some food at Wimbledon Park, Wimbledon Village pr Southfields.

What should I wear?

Take clothing suitable for all conditions and don’t forget a hat, sunglasses but also waterproofs.

What is the second Queue?

Once inside the Grounds, you can queue – again – after 3pm in order to purchase returned Centre Court tickets for £10 or Show Court tickets for £5 from the Ticket Resale Kiosk. Money goes to charity.

A few tips for the Queue?

– follow @ViewfromtheQ Twitter account to get updates and informations on the Queue
– don’t lose your Queue card! Stewards will ckeck your card a few times before entering the grounds
– make sure you have enough cash to pay your ticket
– check out the order of play in advance to know which ticket you want to buy
– it might sounds stupid, but if you intend to queue overnight, learn to pack your tent
– it can be cold at night, so bring good camping mat and sleeping bag
– read the Guide to queuing from the Wimbledon website and Diary of Wimbledon queuer from Grandslamgal blog.
– enjoy the Wimbledon experience!

If you have any question, feel free to leave a comment below, I’ll do my best to reply.

Wimbledon 2016

The majority of Wimbledon tickets are reserved for the public ballots (read more about Wimbledon ballots here). Don’t worry if you had no luck with the ballot or didn’t take part, you still have a few options left.

The Queue

A limited number of tickets are available daily for Centre Court, No.1 Court and No.2 Court, except for the last four days on Centre Court, when all are sold in advance. In addition, several thousand Grounds Passes are available each day at the turnstiles entitling use of unreserved seating and standing room on Courts No.3-19.
Tickets are sold strictly on the basis of one per person queuing and payment is by CASH ONLY.

Depending on your patience and how big of a tennis fan you are, you can join the queue the evening before the game, the morning or the afternoon.

Read more about the queue in Wimbledon Queue 101, a Diary of a Wimbledon queuer and from the Wimbledon website.

Ticketmaster

Several hundred Centre Court and No.3 Court tickets are up for grabs on Ticketmaster the day before each game. The tickets sell out almost immediately. Sign up to the Wimbledon newsletter to get ticket alerts.

Debenture tickets

If you have loads of money to spend, debenture tickets are another option. Debentures are like shares in a company. In exchange for an investment that goes towards ground maintenance and upkeep (new Wimbledon museum, Centre Court retractable roof..), the holder of the debenture gets a fixed number of specific seats for a fixed period of time. One Centre Court debenture ticket is allocated to each holder for every day of The Championships and No. 1 Court debenture tickets are allocated for the first 10 days of The Championships. The debenture holder can then sell the seats they don’t plan to use.

Learn more about debentures from Wimbledon website and check out prices here.

If you have any question, feel free to leave a comment below, I’ll do my best to reply.

Photo credit: Paula Funnell