Roger Federer, Laver Cup 2018


The third edition of the Laver Cup will take place in Geneva, Switzerland, from 20 to 22 September 2019. Here’s all you need to know to buy tickets to this Europe vs rest of the World team competition.

The competition

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The competition pits 6 European players against 6 players from the rest of the world. Tennis legends Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe serve as captain, Thomas Enqvist and Patrick McEnroe as vice captains.
The event is played over 3 days: each day 4 matches are played, 3 singles and a doubles. Each win is worth one point on Friday, 2 on Saturday and 3 on Sunday. Matches are played in the best of 3 sets, with a 10-point match tiebreaker in the third.
The winning team must reach 13 points. In case of a tie, a doubles match is played as a regular set to determine the winner.

Created by Roger Federer‘s management company TEAM8, former Brazilian player Jorge Paulo Lemann and Tennis Australia, the Laver Cup is intended to be the Ryder Cup of tennis. But keep in mind, it is just – contrary to what Federer wants you to believe – a star-studded exhibition, with no sporting interest; a way to make easy money for the players, the occasion to watch the biggest stars of the game for the spectators.

The tickets

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Multi-session tickets

A multi-session ticket will give you access to all five sessions (over three days) at the Laver Cup: Friday: day and night sessions, Saturday: day and night sessions and Sunday: day session. The price of a multi-session ticket starts at CHF 250 (€220). Multi-session tickets go on sale on February 8, 2019 at 10am (CET) online via Ticketcorner or by phone at +41 0900 800 800.

The Laver Cup Insider Pre-Sale will occur on February 5 from 10am to 11:59pm CET. If you registered on the Laver Cup website, you will receive an email the morning of the pre-sale with a link to purchase tickets and a pre-sale code.

Single tickets

A limited number of single session tickets will go on sale online via Ticketcorner on Friday, May 3 at 10:00am CET. Prices range from CHF 25 (€22) to CHF 285 (€250) per ticket.
Single session tickets are only sold in pairs and are limited to one pair per customer.

If you registered on the website, you’ll have access to the Pre-Sale occuring on Thursday, May 2 from 10am to 11:59pm CET. You will receive an email with a link minutes before the pre-sale begins.

Hospitality packages

Hospitality packages are also available starting at CHF 2,600 (€2,300). More details on the official website.

Travel packages

The Laver Cup partnered with Steve Furgal’s International Tennis Tours and Faberg Tour Experience to propose Travel packages including multi-session tickets, hotel, dinners… More details on their website.

A few more things to know:
– there is a 6 ticket limit per purchaser
– there are no discounts for children
– wheelchair seats are only available for purchase via the Ticketcorner ticket hotline, +41 0900 800 800
– all tickets for Laver Cup 2019 will be in the form of a ‘Fan Ticket’. Customers will not have the option to print at home.

Photo credit: Christian Cresante

Read more:
Laver Cup 2018: Team Europe rules again

Novak Djokovic, Laver Cup 2018

The inaugural Laver Cup was held at the O2 arena in Prague, in September last year, with Team Europe, led by Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, defeating Team World 15-9. The second edition of the Laver Cup took place in Chicago last weekend, and Team Europe ruled again with a 13-8 victory.

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The event is played over 3 days: each day 4 matches are played, 3 singles and a doubles. Each win is worth one point on Friday, 2 on Saturday and 3 on Sunday. Matches are played in the best of 3 sets, with a 10-point match tiebreaker in the third. The winning team must reach 13 points. In case of a tie, a doubles match is played as a regular set to determine the winner.

On day 1, Team Europe won the 3 singles, while Federer and Djokovic lost in doubles against the pair of Kevin Anderson and Jack Sock.

Grigor Dimitrov  Frances Tiafoe 6–1 6–4   1–0
 Kyle Edmund  Jack Sock 6–4 5–7 [10–6]   2–0
 David Goffin  Diego Schwartzman 6–4 4–6 [11–9]   3–0
 Novak Djokovic /  Roger Federer  Kevin Anderson /  Jack Sock 7–6 3–6 [6–10]   3–1

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On day 2, Team Europe led by 7 to 1 after Zverev’s win over Isner and Federer tennis lesson to Kyrgios. But Team World rallied back to 5-7 after Kevin Anderson’s surprising win over Novak Djokovic and Kyrgios and Sock doubles victory over Dimitrov and Goffin.

Alexander Zverev  John Isner 3-6 7–6 [10–7]   5–1
 Roger Federer Nick Kyrgios 6-3 6-2   7–1
Novak Djokovic Kevin Anderson 6–7 7-5 [6–10]   7–3
 Grigor Dimitrov /  David Goffin  Nick Kyrgios /  Jack Sock 3-6 4-6   7–5

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Team World led for the first time of the weekend after another doubles victory in day 3’s opening match! But Federer put Team Europe ahead by saving three match points to defeated Isner. And finally it all came down to Zverev, who dropped the first set before leveling at one set all and winning a thrilling match tiebreaker against Anderson. 13-8, Team Europe retains the title!
Next year’s competition will take place in Geneva, Switzerland from 20-22 September.

Roger Federer / Alexander Zverev  John Isner / Jack Sock 6–4 6–7 [9–11]   7–8
 Roger Federer John Isner 6–7 7–6 [10–7]   10–8
Alexander Zverev Kevin Anderson 6–7 7-5 [10-7]   13–8

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Photo credit: Christian Cresante

Monica Seles and Anke Huber, Australian Open 1996

By Claude England, Maryland Match Point

At first I thought it must have been the strong capuccino I had enjoyed after ou last dinner in Melbourne that was keeping me so wide awake, but as the minutes continued to tick by, I came to realize it as the sheer excitement of the past five days at the Australian Open that was still tingling through my body.
So many talented players, great matches, and the magnificent state-of-the-art Australian Open facility. Where to begin?

Mark Philippoussis opened up the center court action with a straight victory over Nicolas Kiefer, who would have, at that time, thought he would go on to upset Pete Sampras in straight sets, only to be thrashed in the following round by fellow Australian Mark Woodforde.
Next it was defending champion Andre Agassi who basically limped onto center court after having the misfortune of hurting a tendon in his knee during a fall on his apartment steps. Andre, wearing a pathetic bandage, somehow won this match against Argentine qualifier Gaston Etlis, who at one point was serving for the match, and at another time was within two points of perhaps the upset of the decade. It was a sad sight from both ends of the court. Etlis played brilliant tennis, showing no mercy for Andre’s inability to move around the court, hitting precision drop shots that the defending champion, instead of racing towards, could only stand and watch. But when it came to winning those final points, Etlis became even more creative in finding ways not to win, and Andre hobbled to a 6-3 in the fifth victory.
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Marion Bartoli

In the players’ box, in the Royal Box, in the commentary box or on the courts, former champions were everywhere!

2-time Wimbledon champion Stefan Edberg, Roger Federer’s coach:

Stefan Edberg

3-time champion Boris Becker, now Novak Djokovic coach:

Boris Becker

Amélie Mauresmo, Andy Murray’s new coach and winner in 2006:

Wimbledon 2014

Sue Barker:

Sue Barker

John McEnroe and Tim Henman:

Wimbledon 2014

Ion Tiriac and Ilie Nastase:

Wimbledon 2014

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Carlos Moya

3 former Roland Garros champions and a former Australian Open runner-up were on Court 1 on Thursday for a fun Legends doubles match.

The beautiful Court 1 – nicknamed the “Bullring” because of its circular shape – is a favorite among serious tennis fans because of its relatively small size and feeling of close proximity to the action.
The Court number 1 has been the scene of some stunning French Open upsets, such as unseeded Gustavo Kuerten‘s 3rd-round victory over Thomas Muster in 1997, on his way to his first of three Roland Garros titles; and Gabriela Sabatini‘s defeat – after a 6-1, 5-1 lead and five match points – to Mary Joe Fernandez in the 1993 quarterfinals. It was also the site of Marat Safin’s famous “dropped pants” match against Felix Mantilla in 2004.

Sadly, court number one will be destroyed. One more proof that decision-makers have no idea what fans like and what makes the beauty of Roland Garros. More informations on Roland Garros stadium modernization.

Court 1

Court 1

Long rallies at the net, jokes, that match was great fun for players and spectators alike:

Court 1

Albert Costa

Carlos Moya

Albert Costa is currently coaching Feliciano Lopez, Thomas Enqvist is Fernando Verdasco’s coach and Carlos Moya is now Spain’s Davis Cup team captain, but I have no idea what Gaston Gaudio has been up to since his retirement, if you have any info, leave a comment below, thanks!

Enjoy more pictures: