Article by Tennis Magazine, April 2014, translated by Tennis Buzz. Read part 1 here.

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014
Roger Federer – Stefan Edberg

Roger Federer:

Edberg was one of my childhood hero. He was not really sure of himself, but he was very flattered, he came to Dubai and we spent a week together. I’m really happy he found time and desire to work with me. He’s really excited I’m sure he can bring me a different perspective.
I don’t see him as a coach, I see him more as a source of inspiration, a legend who spends time with me and taks with my coach Severin Lüthi and me. I’m not 15 anymore, he won’t revolutionize my game. I did not hire Edberg for that. For me, it is something else, a global thing: it’s an inspiration, a motivation to be able to listen to him and talk to him.
It is also interesting to see what he has to say about the evolution of my game towards the net.
I’ve tried a lot of things, I have some ideas but I’m not sue I can do them in matches. It is interesting to see if it’s still possible to do many serves and volleys on today’s slower courts, or if there are other ways for me to go to the net. You think he will dump me if I don’t go to the net?

Stefan Edberg:

It was a real surprise when I received a call from Roger asking me to help him. I was so far away from the tennis world. But Roger is someone so special on and off-court, someone I respect so much that I said “ok, think about it!”
But it’s such an opportunity to work with him… Maybe I can bring something do that he stays in tennis as long as possible because he is extraordinary for our sport. As long as he is healthy and motivated, he has the potential to do great things. The road will be long , but I think he is still good enough to beat anyone.
I do it because I think I can really bring him something. And maybe that little something can bring back Roger to where he was some time ago.
Roger is on court, but maybe hearing a different voice, different speeches from someone who has experienced this situation in the past, will be effective because there are still some things you can work on, details that can be decisive.

Novak Djokovic – Boris Becker

Novak Djokovic:

He can help me progress on a lot of aspects of my game: serve, return, volley. But his most important help is on the mental part. He knows what I feel, the challenges I’m facing, what I’m going through in difficult times.
I was looking for someone who had known similar situations, and I thought of him.
Of course, tennis has evolved, and today’s game is based on today is based on the baseline. But I think with his game, his volleys and the aggressive style he developed, he can really help me.
When you change something in your life, it is always risky, but I do not want to think like that. I chose not to be in fear of change. These are negative feelings.
I am also very pleased to see all these former legends return as coach.
This is very positive for our sport. They won so many Grand Slam tournaments, they have all been number one, they were champions, they know what we’re going through, in the Grand Slams in particular. They can identify to us.

Boris Becker:

I will not go into the details of things we are working on. But because I reached ten Grand Slam finals, I know exactly what a player feels in the final stages of a tournament. As he has already been world number 1, with six Grand Slam titles, I will not teach him how to make a backhand or a forehand. But I think tactically, strategically and mentally, there is room for progress, and that’s why he called me.

Marin Cilic – Goran Ivanisevic

Marin Cilic:

Goran gave me lots of advice on my service. He told me to simplify my gesture “throws the ball in the air and
strikes!” Before, I was thinking too much before serving. But we worked hard on it, and it seems to work. Goran knows what I have work to get to the top. He also brings me all his experience and all the things he has experienced in his career.

Kei Nishikori – Michael Chang

Kei Nishikori:

Michael Chang knows players very well. He gives me great advices on tactics and a lot of confidence. My game will not be fundamentally turned upside down. Michael was part of the top 10 for many years. My goal is to reach the top 10 this is my dream. I hope to learn a lot from him.

Photo by Cindy

Article by Tennis Magazine, April 2014, translated by Tennis Buzz.

When a number 1 from yesterday meets a number 1 from today, what do they talk about? Stories of number 1 of course!
But what can these legends bring to champions whose achievements have nothing to envy theirs? That’s the question… One thing is sure: the 80’s and 90’s are trendier than ever. In fact, the courts took a very vintage look lately.

Two legends, Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker, but also Michael Chang, Sergi Bruguera and Goran Ivanisevic have made their return to the circuit at the Australian Open, alongside their peers.
Ivan Lendl was a pionneer, as he started working with Andy Murray two years ago. But the trend took momentum in the offseason, with associations between Cilic and Ivanisevic (November), Gasquet and Bruguera (end of November), Nishikori and Chang (mid-December), and at last but not at least, two partnerships who had some kind of a bomb effect, Djokovic with Becker and Federer with Edberg (end of December).

What can these former great players add compared to a conventional coach? And why the glories of yesterday have chosen to come back on the circuit? With interviews of players and coaches, Tennis Magazine updates on these duos.

Without a doubt, to have Ivan Lendl by my side was a real bonus.

Readily acknowledged Andy Murray after his first Grand Slam victory at the US Open in 2012, nine months after the beginning of his collaboration with the Czech.
The pair, intriguing at first, was conclusive. Their two parallel respective experiences were obvious: like his coach, Andy Murray finally captured his maiden Grand Slam title after four defeats in the finals.

I knew what he was going through and the frustration that he could feel, explained Ivan Lendl .

Former champions turning to coaching is nothing new. Some have not left a great memory in this role. Mats Wilander with Paul-Henri Mathieu and Marat Safin, Jimmy Connors with Andy Roddick and Maria Sharapova were not really successful. But what’s surprising today is the high number of these collaborations that almost occured at the same time. So, simple coincidence or new trend?

Tennis has always followed trends. Two years ago you had to eat like Djokovic, and 3 players out of 4 found out they were “allergic” to gluten. Now your coach must be a former number 1 or 2 when you are a top 10 player.

Critic, Patrick Mouratoglou distrusts the new trend. So, what can be the actual contribution of these former legends of yesterday to today’s great players?

Their experience is of course their first quality. The top players are seeking some sort of alter ego, someone who like them has experienced the stress of tennis at the highest level.

I was looking for someone who had experienced similar situations, and I thought of Boris, explained Novak Djokovic

Same speech for Marin Cilic, who saw in his compatriot Goran Ivanisevic the ideal person to take him in the top 10.

It is important to have the support from someone like him . He brings me all his experience, and all the things he experienced in his career.

Just as Richard Gasquet who found in Sergi Bruguera a champion who has experienced a very high level with two Grand Slam victories (Roland Garros 1993 and 94), Andy Murray explains how working with someone who has been there can be benefical:

All these players know the state of mind you must have when you play for major finals. And maybe, knowing the situation themselves, they better understand certain decisions taken on the court, under pressure, while it is more difficult to grasp for someone who has never known it.

For Sam Sumyk, Victoria Azarenka’s coach, the experience of high level is an undeniable asset:

They have a greater background than mine for example. They have an asset that lambda coach do not have: the anticipation. They understand better what is going to happen, they have more instinct to know how the player will react on different situations.

For Patrick Mouratoglou , despite his reserves, there is a special relationship between all these legends:

They can talk the same language and shed a different light, or alternatively strengthen positions

For Patrice Hagelauer, Yannick Noah’s coach when he won Roland Garros in 1983:

Former champions see things and analyze them with more objectivity. They are not in emotions like a coach who lives these situations for the first times can be.

If one can understand this process for players looking to access to the highest level like Gasquet, Cilic and Nishikori, it is less evident for Federer or Djokovic, who have at least as much, if not more,
experience at the high level that their own coach and already an outstanding record.

Even though he already has a beautiful trophy case, Novak is not satisfied with his six Grand Slam titles. He wants more and he wants the better team around him to improve, said Boris Becker in Melbourne

Novak Djokovic choice has surprised. How to interpret the world number 2 decision to shake up his stability with his historic coach, Marian Vajda, while he was on the rise after a fantastic year-end. Novak Djokovic wants to see further:

When you change something in your life, it is always risky, but I do not want to think like that. I chose not to be in fear of change.

Novak Djokovic, who has not won a Grand Slam since the Australian Open in 2013 or Roger Federer, seeking
his former glory, want to see in these new collaborations a way to improve again, or return to the top .

Even champions of the caliber of Federer or Djokovic can still improve and change things in their game, says Sam Sumyk. This is the advantage of high level, this is not just the technique of a forehand or backhand,
there are lots of parameters that come into play. The help Edberg can bring to Federer or Becker to Djokovic is on details. It can be in all areas: technique , way of thinking , or state of mind.

Former champion and coach of Lendl , the Pole Wojtek Fibak is more direct :

What they bring is their presence. That’s all, but it is not nothing.

Stefan Edberg also thinks his help will be in the details:

I think I can really bring a little something. And maybe that little something can bring back Roger to where he was some time ago.

A sentence pronounced before the Dubai tournament, where Federer beat Djokovic for the first time in almost two years.

At this level , the difference is therefore on things sometimes insignificant, although difficult to define:

The higher you go, the more you have to unlock things that are difficult to perceive, to feel, said Arnaud Di Pasquale

Eveyone agrees on this, Roger Federer will not revolutionize his game and play the serve and volley constantly to “please” Stefan Edberg, the same goes for Novak Djokovic. But according to the Serbian, Boris Becker contributions can be numerous:

He can help me progress on a lot of aspects of my game: serve, return, volley. But his most important help is on the mental part.

Roger Federer, like Wotjek Fibak, prefers to talk about inspiration rather than mental concerning the presence of Stefan Edberg, his childhood idol, at his side.

I did not hire Edberg to explain me how to come to the net. For me, it is something else, a global thing. I don’t see him in the role of a coach, but more as an inspiration, a legend spending time with me.

Beyond the technical, tactical or physical aspect, the help would be, in general, psychological.

Basically it comes from a need to be reassured, explains Patrice Hagelauer. They seek confidence and serenity
they sometimes lost and need to confide in a champion, who is somehow their equal. I don’t see that as a work of a coach, it is more psychology.

Here we are far away from the role of the coach, in the strict sense, but more in the role of an advisor.

It is a bonus to surround themselves with someone who has experienced the highest level, but the contribution of the great champion does not replace the role of the coach, explains Di Pasquale.

We must not forget that coach is first of all a full-time job, says Mouratoglou.

Without removing anything to the experience of the great champions, a great player does not necessarily make a good coach, while most coaches were not No. 1 or Grand Slam winners.

You can learn how to do this or that shot even if you were not able to do it yourself at very high level, the French system proves it, says Arnaud Di Pasquale .

But only time will tell the impact of these former champions on today’s champions. But it’s obvious it is difficult to compare the cases of Federer and Djokovic and those of Cilic or Nishikori who are still quite far from the top. And the job of a full-time coach has nothing to do with the role that Edberg and Becker play.
We’re not going to find a single answer to very different situations. How else to explain the success of players who keep the same coach for a very long time, if not forever? Like Rafael Nadal, for example …

Escudé, Gasquet, Tsonga

Thanks a lot to Cindy for sharing photos and story of her stay at Indian Wells:

I went to the Indian Wells tournament with my sister-in-law. We had General Admission tickets for the first three days, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. We saw lots of players and some really good tennis.

An overview of part of the Indian Wells Tennis Garden taken from the top of Stadium 3. You are looking at Stadium 1 and the one shady place on the whole site…the treed lawn.

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

We spent all of our first day watching the practise courts. You can see how close you can get to the players! Here is Feliciano Lopez.

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Fernando Verdasco, who was practising with Feliciano Lopez.

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Flavia Pennetta:

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Pennetta was practising with Sara Errani:

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Tommy Haas:

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Haas was practising with Grigor Dimitrov:

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Petra Kvitova:

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And here is Roger Federer! We had to sit in the adjacent practice court to see him! He gets a crowd! We had hoped to see Roger and Wawrinka play doubles but would have had to get to the stadium a couple of hours earlier.

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Stefan Edberg, now Roger Federer’s coach:

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Eugenie Bouchard:

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Vasek Pospisil was practising with Feliciano Lopez in the afternoon.

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Here are Richard Gasquet and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga having a rest in their practise:

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Stan Wawrinka:

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Andy Murray was practising with Wawrinka:

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Photos and text by Cindy

More Indian Wells pics:

Thomas Enqvist and Stefan Edberg, Kings of Tennis, Stockholm

Stefan Edberg flew from Indian Wells to Stockholm to take part to the Kings of Tennis tournament. He beat Henri Leconte and Mats Wilander but Thomas Enqvist was simply to good in final.
Next up for Edberg is a trip to Miami to join Roger Federer for the Miami Masters next week.

From Aftonbladet.se by Andreas Käck, translated into English by Mauro Cappiello:

Henri Leconte, Marcelo Rios, Carlos Moya, Mats Wilander, Stefan Edberg and Thomas Enqvist. The legends gathered in Stockholm for the 2014 edition of the Kings of Tennis and it was the “home player” Enqvist who impressed the most.

In Friday’s final against Edberg there was no doubt: the 40-year-old dominated all through the match and only conceeded five games.

Son of success

Afterwards, he revealed the secret of his success: his son Tim, 7.

He coached me the all week. He used to say, “Dad, why don’t you run on the balls?”. I answered: “Because I can not reach them.” Then he just said: “Yes, but you can not know unless you run.”

Thanked Edberg

Enqvist, who has been part of the organization of the competition for the past two years, however, dedicated most of his victory speech to thank Stefan Edberg.

The fact that we can have Stefan and Mats (Wilander) here, after all they have done for Swedish tennis, is incredible. Thank you for being here, said Enqvist.

Edberg, who recently hit with a certain Roger Federer (his current “pupil”), admitted the defeat and also praised Enqvist.

He went a little too fast today. He played fantastically well, so there was not much I could do. I tried to mix up the game but it was not enough. He (Enqvist) deserved to win.

Business as usual for Serena Williams, Novak Djokovic, David Ferrer and Tomas Berdych who cruise into the second round in straight sets.

The first Slam of the season is already over for 7-time Grand Slam champion Venus Williams, defeated by Ekatarina Makarova. Is it time to retire for the 33 yr old?

Upset of the day: Luksika Kumkhum defeats Petra Kvitova

Last year she lost to Laura Robson in the second round, this year she was defeated by unknown 88-ranked Thai Luksika Kumkhum.
3 years ago, after her surprising Wimbledon victory, Petra Kvitova was seen as a future number one, who would challenge for Grand Slam titles, but she hasn’t so far lived up to expectations.

Seeds upsets:

Julia Goerges def Sara Errani (7), Jie Zheng def Roberta Vinci (12), Alison Riske def Elena Vesnina (23), Guillermo Garcia-Lopez def Tommy Haas (12)

Video highlights:


Tweet of the day: Ashleigh Barty

The young Aussie, ousted 6-2 6-1 by Serena, congratulates her opponent on Twitter. Refreshing.

Image of the day: L’Equipe

Stefan Edberg, Boris Becker and Ivan Lendl on the cover of L’Equipe, the French sports daily. Like in the good old days…
L'Equipe

Matches to follow on Day 2:

Andreas Seppi (23) – Lleyton Hewitt
Rafael Nadal (1) – Bernard Tomic: can Tomic cause an upset like Mark Philippoussis when he beat Sampras in 1996?