Serena Williams Greatness Collection

To celebrate Serena Williams’ phenomenal season, NikeCourt introduces the “Greatness Collection.”

The Greatness Collection features three footwear silhouettes: the NikeCourt Flare, NikeCourt Air Max 1 Ultra and NikeCourt Roshe LD-1000. Each shoe features a juxtaposition of Nike Safari and marble prints.

NikeCourt Flare:

Nike Greatness Collection

NikeCourt Air Max 1 Ultra:

Nike Greatness Collection

NikeCourt Roshe LD-1000:

Nike Greatness Collection

Serena will wear the Greatness Collection’s NikeCourt Flare when competing in New York.

Nike Greatness Collection

To complement her on-court look, Serena will sport the NikeCourt Bomber Jacket.

Nike Greatness Collection

The jacket includes the Serena Williams logo on the center back and her signature quote, “You are strong, powerful and beautiful,” is printed on the sockliner of the shoes and the inside lining of the jacket.

Nike Greatness Collection

Nike Greatness Collection

Nike Greatness Collection

The Greatness Collection is available beginning August 27 at select NikeLab stores and on nike.com/nikelab.

NikeCourt steal the show in New York City

Tennis legends and up-and-coming players met on the street-turned-court in Manhattan to celebrate the 20 years of the Guerilla Tennis commercial featuring archivals Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras.

#tbt Hard to believe it has been over 20 years since Pistol and Andre Agassi pulled this off. Nike Tennis is coming 8.24 on Nike_NYC snapchat to #stealtheshow

Posted by Pete Sampras on jeudi 20 août 2015

Check out the video and a few pictures below:

NikeCourt steal the show

Serena, Rafa, Maria and Roger enjoying the action:

NikeCourt steal the show

Serena Williams:

NikeCourt steal the show

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Serena 2015 US Open Nike dress

A first look at Serena Williams, Maria Sharapova and Rafael Nadal night kits.

World number one Serena Williams will don the Nike Premier Dress while on court in New York. She will complete the look with her signature shoe, the NikeCourt Flare:

Serena Williams

5-time Grand Slam champion Maria Sharapova will sport the Nike Premier Maria Dress:

Maria Sharapova

Maria Sharapova

2-time US Open champion Rafael Nadal will take the court in the Nike Premier Rafa Crew and Nike Gladiator 7” Printed Short:

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal

Nadal will wear his signature shoe, the Nike Lunar Ballistec 1.5:

Rafa Nadal 2015 US Open shoes

The Fall 2015 NikeCourt collection is now available on nike.com/nikecourt

Stay tuned for pictures of Nike day outfits and follow our 2015 US Open coverage.

2015 US Open coverage

Arthur Ashe stadium, 2006

Relive some of the best moments in the US Open history and follow our coverage on Tennis Buzz:

If you attend the Open and wish to share your stories or pictures, please leave us a comment below.

Fashion and gear:

A trip down memory lane:

Top 5 strange events at the US Open
US Open biggest upsets
1970 US Open: Margaret Court completes the Grand Slam
1971 US Open: Chris Evert becomes the “It Girl”
1972 US Open: Ilie Nastase defeats Arthur Ashe
1973 US Open: Margaret Court defeats Evonne Goolagong
1978 US Open: 4th consecutive US Open title for Chris Evert
1978 US Open: Jimmy Connors defeats Bjorn Borg
79 US Open 2nd round: McEnroe vs Nastase, chaos on court
1979 US Open: John McEnroe defeats Vitas Gerulaitis
1980 US Open: John McEnroe defeats Bjorn Borg
1981 US Open: Tracy Austin defeats Martina Navratilova
1981 US Open: John McEnroe defeats Bjorn Borg: Borg’s last Grand Slam match
1983 US Open: Career Grand Slam for Martina Navratilova
1984 US Open: John McEnroe last Grand Slam title
1990 US Open: Linda Ferrando upsets Monica Seles
1990 US Open: Alexander Volkov upsets Stefan Edberg
1991 US Open: Connors, 39 qualifies for the semifinals
1991 US Open: Seles and Capriati introduce power in womens tennis
1991 US Open: playing to perfection, Edberg grabs first Open
1991 US Open: Edberg’s final dominance doesn’t diminish Courier
1992: Stefan Edberg defeats Pete Sampras
1992 US Open: Edberg takes Sampras, US Open, No.1 ranking
1993 US Open: Pete Sampras defeats Cédric Pioline
1994 US Open 4th round: Jaime Yzaga defeats Pete Sampras
1994: first US Open title for Andre Agassi
1995: Pete Sampras defeats Andre Agassi
1996 US Open: Class act Edberg making one last run at US Open
2001 US Open: Venus defeats sister Serena
2001 US Open QF: Andre Agassi – Pete Sampras
2001 US Open: Lleyton Hewitt defeats Pete Sampras
2002 US Open: last Grand Slam title for Pete Sampras
2004 US Open: First time to NYC for a French fan of Agassi
2005 US Open: Roger Federer defeats Andre Agassi
Andre Agassi gives the Open crowd one more thrill ride, August 31st, 2006

Reports:

Polls:

Who will win the 2015 US Open?

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Will Roger Federer win another Grand Slam title before the end of his career?

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Novak Djokovic with Wimbledon trophy

Djokovic sponsors took to Twitter to celebrate his third Wimbledon title, and given the low number of retweets for such big brands, some of them should hire new social media managers and rethink their sponsorship strategy. Let’s have a look at Djokovic sponsors messages on Twitter:

Uniqlo

adidas

Peugeot

Head

Seiko

Social media are a really powerful and cheap way to reach fans and consumers, but Uniqlo, adidas, Head and co failed to promote their champion and their product. The number of retweets and favorites is really low (only 3 retweets for Uniqlo UK!) and it’s not really surprising as these tweets share the same flaws:

bad timing: social media activity reaches his peak during the match and the trophy ceremony, so why wait the next day to react and engage with the fans? That’s what Uniqlo, Peugeot and Seiko did. Peugeot even shared a link to their online game, available only two days later; that really makes no sense.

bad use of hashtags: no hashtags in Seiko’s tweet, no #Wimbledon hashtag for Uniqlo UK and Head, no #NovakDjokovic hashtag or @djokernole mention by adidas, while Peugeot use #TeamDjoko in the picture but #NoleFam in the message…

no call to action: only Peugeot shared a link to their online game. Both Uniqlo and adidas should have added a link to their online store, to buy Novak’s outfit and shoes.

no storytelling: as you can see, Djokovic sponsors (except Seiko) chose a simple message and picture to congratulate their champion: no use of twitter video, vine or gif. Only adidas and Head put a little effort in the image used, while Uniqlo UK’s picture is of such a bad quality you can’t even see clearly the logo on Djokovic jacket. The texts are really bland and Peugeot’s message is quite confusing: “a great opportunity to play on grass”.

On the contrary, Nike did a really good job with their Serena Williams celebratory tweet:

The picture shows the swoosh, the “Just do it” slogan and the Nike Court logo, the green color suggests Wimbledon, while the text sums Serena’s Grand Slams wins. Only things missing are #justdoit and #Wimbledon hashtags as well as a link to buy Serena Williams dress or NikeCourt Flare shoes.
The result: 2,200 retweets and 2,700 faves; that’s more than Uniqlo, adidas, Head, Peugeot and Seiko’s numbers combined.

Also read:
adidas and Novak Djokovic: the one that got away
Social media, the star of Wimbledon 2014
Twitter and Wimbledon 2014: what have the players been up to?

Althea Gibson

From Tennis Confidential by Paul Fein (published in 1999):

“Given the same chance as others have had, blacks would dominate our sport as they have in other sports”, asserted Arthur Ashe, tennis first black men’s champion, in 1968.

For the first half of the twentieth century, blacks had no chance to compete at, let alone dominate, world-class tournaments. A major reason for this racial discrimination was that white athletes in tennis and other sports were afraid of competing on an equal basis with blacks.

“For 120 years, white America has gone to extraordinay lengths to discredit and discourage black participation in sports because black athletes have been so successful,” Ashe wrote in a New York times column.

In the not-so-good old days, the “Whites only” signs on tennis courts didn’t refer only to clothes. To end that separate but unequal segregation and to promote the grassroots game among black Americans, the American Tennis Association was organized in 1916. Before the ATA, black players, chiefly from the Northeast, participated in invitational interstate tournaments, the first being staged in Philadelphia in 1898. But since blacks were barred from playing in United States Lawn Tennis Association – sanctioned tournaments prior to 1940, the ATA struggled for years to ovecome that towering barrier to equality.

Despite a shortage of rackets, balls, courts, topflight coaching and funds for travel, outstanding black players such as Ora Washington, Jimmie McDaniel, and Oscar Johnson Jr emerged. Washington, a superb all-around athlete, captured seven straight ATA national women’s singles titles from 1929 to 1935.
McDaniel was “the greatest black tennis player of them all,” according to Sydney Llewellyn, a self-described archivist of black tennis from New York’s Harlem neighborhood. “McDaniel was better than Ashe. He was bigger, stronger,” Llewellyn told Tennis USTA. “He was a tall lefty, maybe 6’5. He’d take etwo steps and be all over the net. He had it all. He would have won a bunch of Grand Slams somewhere along the line, if he had had the chance.”

He didn’t because his heyday, albeit an obscure one, ended in the 1940s. Johnson dubbed “the Jackie Robinson of tennis”, came closer. As a skinny seventeen-year-old from Los Angeles, he broke ground as the first black to play in and win a USLTA national tournament, the 1948 National Junior Public Parks. Five years later promoter Jack Kramer offered Johnson a pro contact, but a snapped ebow tendon prematurely finished his career.

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