Andy Murray, Wimbledon 2015

Three weeks after the victories of Jelena Ostapenko and Rafael Nadal at Roland Garros, all players have their eyes turned to the grass courts of Wimbledon. With the absences of Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova, the women’s draw is once again wide open, while Roger Federer is the big favorite for the title in the men’s draw.
Follow our coverage on Tennis Buzz and leave us a comment if you want to share your pictures and stories.

Fan’s guide:

A trip down memory lane:

Wimbledon memories: Mrs Blanche Bingley Hillyard
Wimbledon memories: Charlotte Cooper Sterry
Wimbledon memories: Dora Boothby

1960-1969:
Portrait of Wimbledon champion Ann Jones
Wimbledon 1969: Laver’s getting beat by an Indian
Rod Laver – John Newcombe Wimbledon 1969

1970-1979:
Around the grounds at Wimbledon in 1971
Wimbledon 1975: Ashe vs Connors
1976: Bjorn Borg first Wimbledon title
Portrait of 5-time Wimbledon champion Bjorn Borg
Wimbledon 1976: Chris Evert defeats Evonne Goolagong
Portrait of Virginia Wade, winner in 1977
Wimbledon 1978 in pictures
1978: First Wimbledon title for Martina Navratilova
1978: Bjorn Borg defeats Jimmy Connors
Wimbledon 1979: Passing on the record

1980-1989:

1981: First Wimbledon title for McEnroe
1982: Jimmy Connors defeats John McEnroe
1984: John McEnroe defeats Jimmy Connors
1985: Boris Becker, the man on the moon
1986: Boris Becker defeats Ivan Lendl, wins second Wimbledon title
Portrait of 3-time Wimbledon champion Boris Becker
Wimbledon 1987 SF Cash defeats Connors
Wimbledon 1987 Cash defeats Lendl
Tennis culture: Wimbledon victory climb
Wimbledon 1988: An era ends as Graf beats Navratilova
Wimbledon 1988: Edberg a deserving new champion

1990-1999:
Portrait of 2-time Wimbledon champion Stefan Edberg
Wimbledon 1990: Becker vs Edberg
1990: Martina Navratilova’s historic 9th Wimbledon title
Wimbledon 1991: the first Middle Sunday
1991: Michael Stich defeats Boris Becker
1992: first Grand Slam for Andre Agassi
Andre Agassi: thanks to Wimbledon I realized my dreams
1993: Pete Sampras defeats Jim Courier
1994: Pete Sampras defeats Goran Ivanisevic
1995: Tim Henman disqualified!
Wimbledon 1996: singing in the rain
1996: Richard Krajicek upsets Pete Sampras
Wimbledon 1996: a winning streak
1997: Pete Sampras defeats Cédric Pioline

2000-2009:
2000 Wimbledon SF: Pat Rafter defeats Andre Agassi
Wimbledon 2000: did dad call the shots?
2000 Wimbledon Final: Pete Sampras defeats Pat Rafter
2001 Wimbledon 4th round: Federer defeats Sampras
Wimbledon 2001 People’s Final: Ivanisevic vs Rafter

2010-2016:
Wimbledon 2010: Rafael Nadal defeats Tomas Berdych
Wimbledon 2012: Roger Federer defeats Andy Murray
Andy Murray’s road to the Wimbledon 2013 final
Wimbledon 2013: Andy Murray, 77 years after Fred Perry
Wimbledon 2014 coverage
Wimbledon 2015 coverage
Wimbledon 2016 coverage

Discuss:

What if Edberg had coached Henman?

Fashion and gear:

Polls:

Who will win Wimbledon 2017?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Who will win Wimbledon 2017?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
Serena and Venus Williams, Wimbledon 2000

Extract from Tennis’s strangest matches by Peter Seddon:

Despite overcast skies on most days, Wimbledon’s Millenium Championships proved the brightest for some time as story after story made the headlines.
None was more hype than the semifinal between sisters Venus and Serena Williams, the first ever occasion on which sisters had met for a place in the Wimbledon final.

But unusual as the statistic is, it isn’t that which qualifies the match for ‘strange’ status. Nor is it the girls’ unusual route to stardom. Growing up far from privilege in the Compton ghetto district of south central Los Angeles, they were taught the game by their father Richard, who schooled himself in the rudiments by buying a ‘how to do it’ book and video when he decided that tennis was the route to riches for his girls. Way before they reached their teens he was declaring both would be champions. Richard Williams was a man with a mission.

Younger sister Serena won the US Open in 1999. As their semifinal showdown loomed, 20-year-old Venus had yet to land a Grand Slam title.
Most experts tipped Serena to win on form alone but even before the match some respected observers in the know, including players, were already imbuing the contest with its status as an oddity in tennis history.
The result, they said, would be contrived. Dad would give Serena ‘orders’ to lose. It was, quite simply, Venus‘s turn.
Even though Serena had been hitting even hotter than Venus in the run-up, veiled predictions were rife. Reigning champion Lindsay Davenport felt Venus would win ‘for outside reasons’. The 1961 runner-up Christine Janes, British to the core and naturally opposed to skulduggery of any kind, puzzled her fellow Radio 5 Live commentators with the mysterious assertion that the match, which promised to be an all-time classic, would be ‘flat’.
She was spot on. On Thursday 6 July Venus duly romped to victory 6-2 7-6.

Some of the papers were quick to say Serena ‘lost’ it. The Daily Mail pulled few punches: ‘The Williams sisters upset the formbook and sparked a conspiracy theory to rival the assassination of JFK yesterday as hot favorite Serena blundered her way to semifinal defeat,’ it said.

That sort of talk sparked much debate. Camps became split. The match was dissected.
Eighteen-year-old Serena had bludgeoned her way to the semis by dropping only 13 games in five matches en route. Against big sister the unforced errors came thick and fast as she lost another 13 games in this one match. The first set sailed by but, when Venus served two double faults in the first game of the second, a real contest looked on.
Both sisters hit flat out as Serena eased ahead 4-2 and the expectant crowd anticipated a deciding set. Was that the point at which ‘Dad’s orders’ kicked in? Serena promptly lost 11 points in a row, including 5 unforced errors. She trailed 5-4.
Games went to 6-all and a tie-break. Serena led 3-2 before losing the final five points and finishing on a limp double fault.
It was all over. Venus walked sadly to the net, looking rather bemused and concerned and without a flicker of her famous winning smile. Serena fought back tears.

Naturally enough the media asked all the right questions: ‘Was it a family carve up? Had Father issued orders?’ it probed. ‘Not as far as I’m aware,’ replied Venus, with what seemed like a genuine response. Serena somewhat guiltily cast down her eyes and simply said, ‘I can’t answer that question for my family.’

The tennis psychologists drew their own conclusions. Little sister had gone the way of younger siblings the world over, reluctantly accepting to the point of tears that ‘father knows best’.
The headline writers punned themselves silly: ‘THE SISTERS PLAY UGLY AND SAD SERENA MISSES THE BALL,’ barked the Daily Mail.

Only Serena will ever know whether the unforced errors were genuine. What does remain certain is that two days later, Venus beat Lindsay Davenport and lifted her first Grand Slam trophy with such an unbridled display of spontaneous joy that the tennis world was uplifted.
Two days later again the sister act once more hit Centre Court and Serena was back to form as the Williams pairing bounded unfettered to the ladies’ doubles title.
Richard Williams was already on his way home. Both his girls were champions. Mission accomplished.

Serena Williams shoes

In celebration of Serena Williams’ history-making 23rd Slam title, NikeCourt and Jordan Brand present two color versions of the exclusive women’s NikeCourt Flare.
Additionally, the celebratory pack includes the AJ1 SW collaboration, complete with Serena’s personal logo on the tongue and heel.

The NikeCourt x Jordan Brand commemorative box is adorned with Jordan’s iconic Jumpman on the left lid and Williams’ “SW” logo on the right. Beneath each lies graphics which underscore the two champions’ shared athletic achievement. Under the Jumpman lies the number ’23,’ the symbolic tie between MJ and Serena. Additionally, six words (one for each of MJ’s championships) — creative, determined, innovative, classic, performance and stylish — appear as reminder of both athletes’ winning mindset. Beneath Williams’ logo is a flowing pattern highlighting her career. It is intentionally unfinished, allowing for Serena’s drive for continued success.

Serena Williams shoes

Serena Williams shoes

Serena Williams shoes
Read More

Serena Williams

Following Serena Williams‘ 23rd Grand Slam title, John McEnroe reflects on Serena’s legacy:

Growing up in Compton, California, it’s not expected that you’re going to be the greatest tennis player who ever lived, one of the greatest — if not the greatest — athletes in the history of the sport. It’s a situation that comes along once every hundred years.

Serena has had something special ever since I saw her at eight years old, [when] I hit a few balls with her and her sister. But I didn’t realize at the time that she’d be as great as she is. She has this will — more will than any other male or female player I’ve ever seen. Even though she has accomplished a lot, she wants more. That’s something that separates a champion from a truly great champion. She wasn’t satisfied when she got as many majors as her sister. She wasn’t satisfied when she caught up to [past champions] and she doesn’t seem satisfied now that she’s claimed the record for singles title in the Open Era. She wants to be considered the best ever.

Even though she has accomplished a lot, she wants more. That’s something that separates a champion from a truly great champion.

She’s the player who’s gotten out of more trouble, out of more match-point situations, out of more match-game situations; she’s in another gear, mentally. It’s hard to dig deep in your soul to find what it is that allows you to continue — to not only want it but to train for it and accept it. When that happens, people may treat you differently. They may resent it. They may have trouble accepting it, may not respect it, so you put yourself out on an island a little bit.

Early in her career, she didn’t play a great deal of tournament tennis, and a lot of people around the sport thought that hurt her. Ironically, it ended up helping her play as long as she has, because there’s still mental freshness to her that has allowed her to maybe even improve in her 30s, which is extremely hard to do in tennis.

She’s been able to find that comfort level, where she’s been able to excel and bring out the best in her tennis. There’s a lot that she’s been able to show younger players and there’s a lot to be learned from what she has done.

Source: Nike

Serena Williams Australian Open 2017

Serena and Venus will meet on Saturday in ninth all-Williams Grand Slam final. Serena will hit the court wearing the NikeCourt Dry dress:

Serena Williams Australian Open dress

Serena Williams Australian Open dress

Serena Williams Australian Open dress

Shop Serena Williams’ look.

Follow our Australian Open coverage.