Novak Djokovic
Indian Wells

Flavia Pennetta def Agnieszka Radwanska 6-2 6-1
Novak Djokovic def Roger Federer 3-6 6-3 7-6
Su-Wei Hsieh/Shuai Peng def Cara Black/Sania Mirza 7-6 6-2
Bob and Mike Bryan def Alexander Peya/Bruno Soares 6-4 6-3

Flavia Pennetta

The 32 yr old Italian defeated the top two seeds, Li Na and Agniezska Radwanska to capture the biggest title of her career. With a semifinal at the US Open, a quarterfinal at the Australian Open, her game has been really solid these last few months. Read her interview here.

Agnieszka Radwanska

She appeared ready to win a title that counts for a big step once again, but as often Agnieszka Radwanska wasn’t able to come through in a big-stage match. Injured (? – but that injury didn’t prevent her from playing in Miami and reaching the quarterfinals at the Sony Open), the 25 yr old Pole was devastated by her loss.

Simona Halep

The Romanian, who won the first six titles of her career last year, reached her first Premier Mandatory semifinal at Indian Wells and is now the new world number 5.

Maria Sharapova

The defending champion was ousted by world number 79 Camila Giorgi in the third round. With this loss she has dropped to number 7, her lowest ranking since the summer of 2011.

Novak Djokovic

First title of the season for the world number 2, a much needed title after his disppointing quarterfinal loss at the Australian Open.

Roger Federer

A resurgent Federer reached the final without dropping a set, but a couple of unforced errors in the third set tiebreaker cost him the final and the title.

Alexandr Dolgopolov

He had never won a set against Nadal before, but Dolgopolov beat him in the third round and then defeated Fabio Fognini and Milos Raonic to make his first ATP Masters 1000 semifinal.

Miami Sony Open

Serena Williams def Li Na 7-5 6-1
Novak Djokovic def Rafael Nadal 6-3 6-3
Martina Hingis/Sabine Lisicki def Ekaterina Makarova/Elena Vesnina 4-6 6-4 10-5
Bob and Mike Bryan def Juan Sebastian Cabal/Robert Farah 7-6 6-4

Serena Williams

She started the tournament slowly with a three sets win over Caroline Garcia and then rolled to the title with straight sets victory over Coco Vandeweghe, Angelique Kerber, Maria Sharapova and Li Na. After a victory in Brisbane and losses in Melbourne and Dubai, she won her second title of the year, her 7th in Miami.

Li Na

First Premier Mandatory final for Li Na who had set point in the first but she lost 11 of the last 12 games.

Dominika Cibulkova

She followed her final in Melbourne with a win in Acapulco, a quarterfinal at Indian Wells, and after her run through the Miami semifinals, the Slovakian makes her entry to the top 10.

Maria Sharapova

She has now lost her last 15 matches against Serena Williams, in fact Serena hasn’t lost to Sharapova since 2004 in Los Angeles! The Russian hasn’t progressed in any area of her game and she could drop out of the top 10 soon.

Martina Hingis

The former world number one teamed up with Sabine Lisicki to win her 38th doubles title, her first in seven years.

Novak Djokovic

Nadal and Djokovic played each other for the 40th times. Djokovic dominated from the start and won comfortably 6-3 6-3. It is his fourth Miami title, his 18th Masters 1000 title overall. Only Andre Agassi has won the Key Biscayne tournament more (6).

Is the Nadal-Djokovic rivalry the best in the Open Era? Vote and share your thoughts.

Rafael Nadal

Nadal is now 0-4 in finals at Key Biscayne, one of just three ATP Masters 1000 events he has yet to win.

Kei Nishikori

Nishikori saved 4 match points to beat David Ferrer in three sets and three hours of play, but he had plenty left in the tank to upset Roger Federer in the quarterfinals. Unfortunately he hurt himself and had to withdraw from the semifinals.

Andy Murray

The Scot announced his split with Ivan Lendl after two years of collaboration, 2 Grand Slam titles and an Olympic Gold medal. The announcement took nearly everyone in the game by surprise but the split was amicable. Check out my video of Lendl being interviewed at the World Tennis Day in London a month ago in which he talks about that Scottish boy.

Lleyton Hewitt

With his win over Robin Haase in the first round, Lleyton Hewitt has become the 21st male player to record 600 match wins. Only Roger Federer (942) and Rafael Nadal (675) have won more matches among active players.

Sampras and Agassi

French sports daily L’Equipe celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Federer-Nadal rivalry (they first met in Miami in 2004, Nadal won in straight sets 6-3 6-3) and at this occasion they published their 5 best mens tennis rivalries. Here’s their ranking (article by L’Equipe, translation by Tennis Buzz):

1. Federer-Nadal (since 2004)

Despite the fact that Nadal won more than 2 out of 3 of their meetings, their duel still fascinates. Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal played a record 8 Grand Slam finals against each other.

2. Borg-McEnroe (1978-1981)

Fire and ice, ice and fire. You had to choose your side: the steadfast right-handed or the flamboyant left-handed, the inscrutable one and the temperamental one. For many, this rivalry symbolizes the first golden era of tennis. Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe met only 14 times including 4 Grand Slam finals (head-to-head: 7-7), but they played that epic Wimbledon final in 1980 and the tiebreak everyone remembers (18-16 in the fourth set).

(Check out some pics and videos of Borg and McEnroe renewing their rivalry at the Optima Open here)

3. Sampras-Agassi (1989-2002)

Another opposition of styles and personalities. On one side, Sampras offensive game and underdeveloped charism, on the other side, Agassi‘s thousands lifes and looks, his sharp eye and laser-like groundstrokes. Sampras often prevailed (20-14 overall, 4-1 in Grand Slam finals for Sampras), but they played some memorable matches like their 2001 US Open quarterfinal (4 sets, 4 tiebreakers).

(Check out some pics and videos of Agassi and Sampras renewing their rivalry at the World Tennis London Showdown here)

4. Nadal-Djokovic (since 2006)

The classic of the classics (39 meetings) could climb up the rankings because they could play some other memorable matches like the Australian Open 2012 final (5 hours and 53 minutes of play), the 2011 US Open final and the semifinals in Madrid in 2009 and at Roland Garros last year. The decathletes of modern tennis have already played 6 Grand Slam finals against each other (4 wins for the Spaniard).

5. Edberg-Becker (1984-1996)

We could have chosen a more fiercy rivalry (Lendl-McEnroe ou Connors-McEnroe) but we preferred to remember the time when two pure attacking players ruled the world. Edberg opposed a wonderful technical fluidity to Becker‘s power. The German has often had the upper hand (25-10 in their head-to-head) but Edberg won 2 of their 3 Grand Slam finals, all 3 at Wimbledon.

What do you think of this top 5? Personnaly I would vote Borg-McEnroe for top rivalry because of their bigger contrast in styles, personalities and their mythic Wimbledon 1980 final.
Happy to see Edberg-Becker at number five, back in the days I really loved watching them play at Wimbledon.
Please vote and share your thoughts.

Men's tennis best rivalry?

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Federer and Edberg, Miami 2014

After his loss to Thomas Enqvist in the final of the Kings of Tennis tournament in Stockholm, Stefan Edberg flew back to ths US to join Roger Federer at the Miami Masters. Enjoy these pictures of the two tennis greats at practice.

Roger Federer and Stefan Edberg

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Follow our Miami Sony Open 2014 coverage

Photo credit: Bev

Novak Djokovic

First title of the year for Djokovic, his third Indian Wells title, 42th overall.

Djokovic:

I’m just very happy and thrilled to be able to win the first title in this season. It was the first final that I played this year. It was necessary for my confidence, and hopefully I can carry that into Miami and the rest of the season.

Federer:

A few weeks ago, months ago, a few people said I couldn’t play tennis anymore. So for me, I need to focus on my own game, on my own routines, hard work, make sure I keep a good schedule for myself. But at the same time, that fire, wanting to win, is important and right now I have that. I have a really good balance right now.

Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer

Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer

Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer

Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer

Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer

Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer

Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer

Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer

Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer

Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer

Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer

Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer


Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer


Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer


Thanks a lot to Josh for sharing his pictures.

Roger Federer and Stan Wawrinka

Thanks a lot to Remus Baias for sharing these pictures of Roger Federer and Stanislas Wawrinka practising together at Indian Wells. The Swiss stars also played doubles together, they were beaten in the semifinals by Alexander Peya and Bruno Soares.

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Photo credit: Remus Baias

Roger Federer and Stefan Edberg

Thanks to Love @ll for sharing these pics of Roger Federer and Stefan Edberg.
Want to know more about the Federer-Edberg collaboration, read this article by Tennis Magazine: Former champions: true or false coaches?

Club Fed.

Hey Roger Federer, what does RF stand for?

"Hey, I'm gonna stop at IKEA. You want anything?"

"Blergh dah ger der gah deh jorgensen.

"Who's that Swedish guy who keeps following me?"

Who dat iz?

Swiss CHEESE.

Swedish meatball. Hee.

Security. Security!

That is not how you hit a forehand, Roger.

Awww shucks.

All eyes on Rog.

Roger is not impressed.

"Eh, I can do better."

Working on the backhand.

Casting a long shadow.

Where were we?

Fleet feet.