Preview, recap and analysis:

Aussie youngsters
Three women who had a great Australian Open… and two who didn’t

A trip down memory lane:

Australian Open trivia
The tragedy of Daphne Akhurst
The Norman Brookes Challenge Cup
1960 Australian Open: Neale Feaser, a costly volley
1960-63 Australian Open: Jan Lehane four time runner-up
1987-1988 Swedes spoil the party
January 11, 1988: first day of play at Flinders Park
2001 Australian Open: Pat’s last chance
2001 Australian Open final: Andre Agassi defeats Arnaud Clément
2003 Australian Open: last Grand Slam title for Agassi
2005 Australian Open: Heartbreak for Lleyton Hewitt

Marketing:

Australian Open 2013: live like a player

Fashion and gear:

Roger Federer Nike outfit preview
Rafael Nadal Nike outfit preview
Roger Federer Nike outfit
Juan Martin Del Potro Nike outfit
Serena Williams Nike outfit
Maria Sharapova Nike outfit
Victoria Azarenka Nike outfit
Li Na Nike outfit
Ana Ivanovic adidas dress
Venus Williams dress by EleVen
Kei Nishikori and Shingo Kunieda Uniqlo outfit
Lleyton Hewitt C’mon outfit

Polls:

Who will win the Australian Open 2013?

  • Novak Djokovic (44%, 56 Votes)
  • Roger Federer (41%, 53 Votes)
  • Andy Murray (7%, 9 Votes)
  • Juan Martin Del Potro (3%, 4 Votes)
  • Other (2%, 3 Votes)
  • Tomas Berdych (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (1%, 1 Votes)
  • David Ferrer (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Richard Gasquet (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Milos Raonic (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 128

Loading ... Loading ...

Who will win the Australian Open 2013?

  • Serena Williams (37%, 45 Votes)
  • Maria Sharapova (26%, 31 Votes)
  • Victoria Azarenka (17%, 20 Votes)
  • Agnieszka Radwanska (7%, 8 Votes)
  • Li Na (5%, 6 Votes)
  • Other (5%, 6 Votes)
  • Angelique Kerber (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Petra Kvitova (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Sam Stosur (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Sara Errani (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 121

Loading ... Loading ...

The new tennis season is fast approaching, and the best players in the world are busy training hard in preparation for another demanding and gruelling year on tour. But before we launch into 2013, we should take a moment to reflect on the careers and legacies of those who hung up their racquets for the last time in 2012…

Biggest ATP Retirement: Andy Roddick

Andy Roddick

On his 30th birthday, Andy Roddick called a press conference and revealed that the 2012 US Open would be his final competitive tournament. The decision caught everyone by surprise, but it seemed fitting for a man who, used to giving his all, knew that his body was no longer able to withstand a brutal training and playing regime.

Roddick had been his country’s number one player for most of the last decade. Blessed with one of the biggest serves in the history of the game, he regularly sent down unreturnable deliveries of over 220km/h, accompanied by his trademark compact swing and shotgun-like pop. He resembled an exuberant puppy on the court, pouncing on short balls and unleashing his formidable off-forehand with relish. Not the most naturally fluid of players, Roddick constantly strove to expand his arsenal of shots, and developed a very effective all-court game. Occasionally, his temper got the better of him, and umpires were often in his firing line, but he earned a reputation for being extremely gracious in defeat, and was a fan favourite wherever he played.

At the time, his 2003 US Open win seemed to herald the arrival of a new hero in American tennis, but Roddick’s main misfortune was to have shared an era with Roger Federer. He fell to the Swiss in four Grand Slam finals, including three at Wimbledon. The most heartbreaking was a 16-14 loss in the deciding set of the 2009 Wimbledon final, a match in which Roddick’s serve was broken only once. In all, he had a 3-21 record against Federer, and one wonders how much more decorated the Nebraskan’s career would have been without that perennial obstacle.

Biggest WTA Retirement: Kim Clijsters

Kim Clijsters

Kim Clijsters has the distinction of retiring for a second time in 2012. The Belgian originally called it a day in 2007, citing mounting injuries and her desire to start a family. The lure of competition proved too strong, however, and she returned to the WTA tour in 2009.
Read More

Extract from Agassi‘s book Open:

“I’m the second seed in the 2003 Australian Open, and I come out growling, ferocious. I reach the semis and beat Ferreira in ninety minutes. In six matches I’ve dropped only one set.

Andre Agassi

In the final I face Rainer Schuettler from Germany, I win three straight sets, losing only five games and tying the most lopsided victory ever at the Australian Open. My eighth slam, and it’s my best performance ever. I tease Stefanie that it’s like one of her matches, the closest I’ll ever come to experiencing her kind of dominance.

Rainer Schuettler
Read More