Rafael Nadal

Andy Murray poster at Wimbledon Station: Wimbledon awaits

Maria Sharapova’s Sugarpova pop-up store in Wimbledon Village:

Sugarpova pop-up store

2001 Wimbledon champion Goran Ivanisevic:

Goran Ivanisevic

Henman Hill (or Murray Mound?)

Henman Hill

Petra Kvitova leaving practice courts:

Petra Kvitova

Last year’s runner-up Sabine Lisicki practising:

Sabine Lisicki

The queue arriving at Wimbledon:

The queue arriving at Wimbledon

Centre Court before play starts:

Wimbledon Centre Court

Ball Boys and Girls:

Ball Boys and Girls

Rafael Nadal and Lukas Rosol arrive on Centre Court for a rematch of their 2012 second round meeting:

Rafael Nadal

Crown Prince Frederick and Princess Mary of Denmark in the Royal Box:

Crown Prince Frederick and Princess Mary of Denmark

Denise Lewis, Jonathan Edwards, James and Pippa Middleton in the Royal Box:

Denise Lewis, Jonathan Edwards, James and Pippa Middleton

Rafael Nadal:

Rafael Nadal

Lukas Rosol:

Lukas Rosol

Chelsea Pensioners enjoying the match:

Chelsea Pensioners enjoying the match

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal

Lukas Rosol and Rafael Nadal

Led 4-6 2-4, Nadal rallies and wins in 4 sets 4-6 7-6 6-4 6-4. He’ll face Mikhail Kukushkin in the third round.

Next on Centre Court, Angelique Kerber and Heather Watson:

Angelique Kerber

Angelique Kerber

Heather Watson

1969 Wimbledon champion Ann Jones watching the match (to know more about this champion who also excelled in table tennis, read her portrait written by journalist Rex Bellamy)

Ann Jones

6-2 5-7 6-1 win for world number seven Angelique Kerber.

Angelique Kerber

Last match of the day on Centre Court: 7-time Wimbledon champion Roger Federer faces Gilles Muller.

Roger Federer

Mirka Federer:

Mirka Federer

Stefan Edberg:

Stefan Edberg

Gilles Muller:

Gilles Muller

Rain stops play at Wimbledon. Rain on Henman Hill:

Rain on Henman Hill

View from Henman Hill, you can see the Shard in the background:

View from Henman Hill

Empty practice courts:

Empty practice courts

The roof makes its first appearance at Wimbledon 2014:

Centre Court at Wimbledon

Centre Court at Wimbledon

Good day at the office for Federer who wins in straight sets 6-3 7-5 6-3.

Roger Federer

Gilles Muller and Roger Federer

Thanks a lot to Karen for her pictures and story. Follow our Wimbledon 2014 coverage

2014 Wimbledon champion Novak Djokovic

The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club:

Wimbledon guided tour – part 1
Wimbledon guided tour – part 2
Wimbledon Centre Court roof
Court 3 : a new Show Court at Wimbledon
Waiting in the Queue to Wimbledon
Wimbledon Museum: The Queue exhibition
The Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum: Player Memorabilia

Fashion and gear:

Marketing:

A trip down memory lane:

Wimbledon Trivia
Wimbledon past champions: stats and records
Wimbledon ‘s biggest upsets
Wimbledon memories: Mrs Blanche Bingley Hillyard
Wimbledon memories: Charlotte Cooper Sterry
Wimbledon memories: Dora Boothby
Portrait of Wimbledon champion Ann Jones
Wimbledon 1969: Laver’s getting beat by an Indian
Rod Laver – John Newcombe Wimbledon 1969
Bjorn Borg – Ilie Nastase Wimbledon 1976
Portrait of 5-time Wimbledon champion Bjorn Borg
Wimbledon 1976: Chris Evert defeats Evonne Goolagong
Portrait of Virginia Wade, winner in 1977
1981: First Wimbledon title for McEnroe
1982: Jimmy Connors defeats John McEnroe
1984: John McEnroe defeats Jimmy Connors
1985: Boris Becker, the man on the moon
Portrait of 3-time Wimbledon champion Boris Becker
Wimbledon 1988: An era ends as Graf beats Navratilova
Wimbledon 1988: Edberg a deserving new champion
Portrait of 2-time Wimbledon champion Stefan Edberg
Wimbledon 1991: the first Middle Sunday
1992: first Grand Slam for Andre Agassi
Andre Agassi: thanks to Wimbledon I realized my dreams
1993: Pete Sampras defeats Jim Courier
1994: Pete Sampras defeats Goran Ivanisevic
1996: Richard Krajicek upsets Pete Sampras
1997: Pete Sampras defeats Cédric Pioline
2000 Wimbledon SF: Pat Rafter defeats Andre Agassi
2000 Wimbledon Final: Pete Sampras defeats Pat Rafter
2001 Wimbledon 4th round: Federer defeats Sampras
Wimbledon 2010: Rafael Nadal defeats Tomas Berdych
The Spirit of Wimbledon: a 4-part documentary by Rolex retracing Wimbledon history

Recaps:

Polls:

Will Andy Murray retain his Wimbledon title?

  • No (80%, 45 Votes)
  • Yes (20%, 11 Votes)

Total Voters: 56

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Who will win Wimbledon 2014?

  • Roger Federer (31%, 14 Votes)
  • Rafael Nadal (24%, 11 Votes)
  • Novak Djokovic (24%, 11 Votes)
  • Andy Murray (13%, 6 Votes)
  • Milos Raonic (4%, 2 Votes)
  • Stan Wawrinka (2%, 1 Votes)
  • Tomas Berdych (0%, 0 Votes)
  • David Ferrer (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ernests Gulbis (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Richard Gasquet (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Other (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 45

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Who will win Wimbledon 2014?

  • Maria Sharapova (41%, 12 Votes)
  • Serena Williams (21%, 6 Votes)
  • Other (14%, 4 Votes)
  • Li Na (10%, 3 Votes)
  • Simona Halep (7%, 2 Votes)
  • Petra Kvitova (3%, 1 Votes)
  • Victoria Azarenka (3%, 1 Votes)
  • Agniezska Radwanska (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Jelena Jankovic (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Angelique Kerber (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dominika Cibulkova (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 29

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Escudé, Gasquet, Tsonga

Thanks a lot to Cindy for sharing photos and story of her stay at Indian Wells:

I went to the Indian Wells tournament with my sister-in-law. We had General Admission tickets for the first three days, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. We saw lots of players and some really good tennis.

An overview of part of the Indian Wells Tennis Garden taken from the top of Stadium 3. You are looking at Stadium 1 and the one shady place on the whole site…the treed lawn.

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

We spent all of our first day watching the practise courts. You can see how close you can get to the players! Here is Feliciano Lopez.

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Fernando Verdasco, who was practising with Feliciano Lopez.

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014-2

Flavia Pennetta:

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014-3

Pennetta was practising with Sara Errani:

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Tommy Haas:

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Haas was practising with Grigor Dimitrov:

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Petra Kvitova:

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

And here is Roger Federer! We had to sit in the adjacent practice court to see him! He gets a crowd! We had hoped to see Roger and Wawrinka play doubles but would have had to get to the stadium a couple of hours earlier.

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Stefan Edberg, now Roger Federer’s coach:

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Eugenie Bouchard:

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Vasek Pospisil was practising with Feliciano Lopez in the afternoon.

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Here are Richard Gasquet and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga having a rest in their practise:

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Stan Wawrinka:

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Andy Murray was practising with Wawrinka:

BNP Paribas Open Indian Wells March 2014

Photos and text by Cindy

More Indian Wells pics:

Business as usual for Serena Williams, Novak Djokovic, David Ferrer and Tomas Berdych who cruise into the second round in straight sets.

The first Slam of the season is already over for 7-time Grand Slam champion Venus Williams, defeated by Ekatarina Makarova. Is it time to retire for the 33 yr old?

Upset of the day: Luksika Kumkhum defeats Petra Kvitova

Last year she lost to Laura Robson in the second round, this year she was defeated by unknown 88-ranked Thai Luksika Kumkhum.
3 years ago, after her surprising Wimbledon victory, Petra Kvitova was seen as a future number one, who would challenge for Grand Slam titles, but she hasn’t so far lived up to expectations.

Seeds upsets:

Julia Goerges def Sara Errani (7), Jie Zheng def Roberta Vinci (12), Alison Riske def Elena Vesnina (23), Guillermo Garcia-Lopez def Tommy Haas (12)

Video highlights:


Tweet of the day: Ashleigh Barty

The young Aussie, ousted 6-2 6-1 by Serena, congratulates her opponent on Twitter. Refreshing.

Image of the day: L’Equipe

Stefan Edberg, Boris Becker and Ivan Lendl on the cover of L’Equipe, the French sports daily. Like in the good old days…
L'Equipe

Matches to follow on Day 2:

Andreas Seppi (23) – Lleyton Hewitt
Rafael Nadal (1) – Bernard Tomic: can Tomic cause an upset like Mark Philippoussis when he beat Sampras in 1996?

The Australian Open 2013 has been an eventful one on the women’s side, including controversy, breakthrough performances, shock results and one of the more bizarre Grand Slam finals you’re ever likely to see. So who leaves Melbourne with their head held high, and who has had a tournament to forget?

Here are three WTA players who rose to the occasion down under…

Victoria Azarenka

Yes, she may have drawn the ire of both seasoned observers and casual fans following her mega-dubious decision to take a medical timeout at a tense moment in her semi-final match, but the controversy should not take away from the fact that Victoria Azarenka won the tournament. Facing a blizzard of media pressure, a quasi-hostile crowd (“Cheatarenka” said one of the banners) and one of the trickiest opponents on tour, Azarenka was a paragon of mental strength. She came from a set down to defend her title, keep her top ranking and set herself up for another hugely successful season.

Victoria Azarenka

Li Na

Beloved by the Australian crowd – as well as anyone who watches her post-match interviews – Li Na proved that she could still hang with – and beat – the best in the world. The 2011 French Open champion had struggled to make an impact at recent Grand Slams, leading some to bemoan her inconsistency and label her a “one-slam wonder.” But last summer, China’s best ever player got a new coach (Carlos Rodriguez, the man who led Justine Henin to seven Grand Slam titles), and got to work. She outwitted Agnieszka Radwanska and out-blasted Maria Sharapova on her way to the final, and but for two untimely and painful-looking falls, she may well have lifted the trophy. It wasn’t to be, but hopefully Li can take this form forward and become a serious contender again.

Li Na

Sloane Stephens

Along with Li, Stephens became the darling of this year’s Australian Open. Smiling all the way to the semi-finals, and entertaining us with her brand of tactically aware and courageous tennis, the 19-year-old hit the big time with an unforgettable victory over Serena Williams. Granted, Williams was injured and far from her best, but even a hobbled Serena is good enough to beat most players. Stephens stepped up and played the big points brilliantly, proving that she really can live up to the hype. Melbourne was undoubtedly a life-changer for the Floridian, and it will be fascinating to see how she makes the transition from up-and-coming challenger to bona fide top player.

Sloane Stephens

…and two women who made noise for all the wrong reasons…

Petra Kvitova

Petra Kvitova has no shortage of admirers. The legendary Martina Navratilova said she saw shades of herself in the 2011 Wimbledon champion, and her game has been hailed as one of the most complete in tennis: she has a big lefty serve, great volleys and power from the back of the court. Which makes her second round exit at the Australian Open all the more disappointing. Kvitova lost a scrappy but enthralling battle to Laura Robson 11-9 in the third set, hitting far too many unforced errors and looking, at times, like a shadow of her former self. At her best, she could dominate the rest of the field, and possibly even give Serena a run for her money, but Kvitova needs to rediscover her confidence fast before an ignominious rankings spiral beckons.

Sam Stosur

The curious career of Sam Stosur took another turn for the unfortunate in Melbourne. Her poor home record is well-documented, but after winning her opening match and leading Jie Zheng 5-2 in the third set of their second round match, it looked as though Stosur might have finally put those demons to rest. Alas, the Aussie lost the next five games and tumbled out of the tournament, a situation she later described as “a bit of a choke.” Like Kvitova, Stosur has an elite game when on form: her stunning victory over Serena Williams in the 2011 US Open final is proof of that. Yet her confidence, mental clarity and consistency can utterly desert her, leading to ugly, head-scratching losses to players she should beat as a matter of routine. Where she goes from here is anyone’s guess, but it would be a great pity to witness such a talented player suffer an extended slump.

Steven Webb writes for Livestreamingsport.com an award-winning sports, news and live stream website.
Photos by Tennis Buzz (French Open 2012)