Kim Clijsters and her daughter, 2009 US Open

In 2007 at the age of 23, Kim Clijsters retired to start a family. Two years later she defeated Caroline Wozniacki in the US Open final to become the first mother to win a Grand Slam title since Evonne Goolagong in 1980.

From Bud Collins History of tennis:

Serena, the title holder, was the one constant in the quarterfinals – but who were these other folks?
Well, 23-year-old Kim Clijsters, the 2005 champ, looked familiar. However, she’d been retired almost three seasons, had a baby, and played only seven matches coming into New York as a wild card with no WTA ranking.

Amazingly, she also looked formidable, the lone unseeded/wild card entry to win the title, 7-5 6-3, over 19-year-old Caroline Wozniacki. As the first Dane to ascend to the final, Caroline had ousted 2004 champ Svetlana Kuznetsova 2-6 7-6 7-6 in the fourth round.

But of course, the sweetheart of Flushing – the crowds’ darling was 17-year-old Georgian Melanie Oudin; who tool off from number 70 and didn’t come down until number 9 Wozniacki stopped her in the quarters 6-2 6-2. But prior to that, come-backing Melanie the Fair Maid of Marietta, conducted her private war with Russia. Short, but long of baseline strokes and fight, she overcame numbers 36-4-29-13 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova 6-1 6-2, Elena Dementieva 5-7 6-4 6-3, Maria Sharapova 3-6 6-4 7-5, Nadia Petrova 1-6 7-6 6-3.

Co-favorites were the Sisters Williams, but Clijsters chased both of them, Venus in the fourth round 6-0 0-6 6-4, and Serena in a bizarre and contentious semi, 6-4 7-5. The latter disrupted the tournament, a match disintegrating on a sad though historic note – a penalty point leveled a raging Serena was the abrupt end. At 15-30, Serena serving a second ball, was called for a foot fault, stepping on the baseline. That made it 15-40, match point. Whereupon Serena lost her head and directed a profane, threatening tirade at the Japanese baseline judge, Shino Tsurubuchi, raising her racquet menacingly at the official. Since the American had already incurred a warning violation for smashing her racquet at the close of the first set, the next infraction – her blow-up – called for a penalty point from umpire Louise Engzell. That concluded the game and the match, an unprecedented closure without a ball being struck. Williams was fined $10,000 by the US Open, but later fined another $82,500 (a record fine) by the Grand Slam Committee. She was fortunate not to be suspended. Another stranger, number 50, Belgian Yanina Wickmayer, got to the semis, there beaten by Wozniacki, 6-3 6-3.

Jennifer Capriati

By Bruce Schoenfeld, Tennis Magazine (November/December 2004)

At 28, Jennifer Capriati knows her days are numbered. Following a dramatic but disappointing run to the US Open semifinals, her hopes of another major victory now rest on the 2005 Australian Open.

Jennifer Capriati had been crying. Her red-rimmed eyes gave her away as she stepped into the interview room in Arthur Ashe stadium after her semifinal loss to Elena Dementieva at the US Open. Usually so calm, so cautious, so media-trained, she couldn’t help but offer a glimpse into her soul.

Who could blame her? It was all so unfair. She’d fought so hard against Serena Williams in the quarterfinals, doing what she had to do to win, only to have it undermined by that silly controversy about the umpire’s overrule. For two days, it was all she saw on television, the ball landing near the line and Serena striding toward the chair. Didn’t they have anything else to talk about? Lying in bed at night, she replayed the point over and over, like a bad song she couldn’t get out of her head. Then, against Dementieva, she had found herself a game away from finally reaching a US Open final after all these years. And wouldn’t you know it? The wind was swirling, the sun was in her eyes, and suddenly she was out of the Open again, facing a press conference like so many others.

She’d squandered her fist opportunity, in 1991, as a 15-year-old, losing a memorable semifinal match to Monica Seles in a third-set tiebreaker that would haunt Capriati for years. A decade later, in 2001, she reached another semifinal, this time losing to Venus Williams in straight sets. And then last year she’d served for the match in the semis against Justine Henin-Hardenne but couldn’t close it out. This year’s semifinal against Dementieva, who was floating seves of 60 mph and slower across the net, presented her best chance, and possibly her last.

“I was just thinking, Play the wind the best you can,” she murmured. “I guess I waited for her maybe to make a few more errors. I mean, I can’t really…” She trailed off. “I don’t know.”

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Women’s Singles

Gold: Serena Williams (USA)
Silver: Maria Sharapova (Russia)
Bronze: Victoria Azarenka (Belarus)

Women’s Doubles

Gold: Serena Williams and Venus Williams (USA)
Silver: Andrea Hlavackova and Lucie Hradecka (Czech Republic)
Bronze: Maria Kirilenko and Nadia Petrova (Russia)

Mixed Doubles

Gold: Victoria Azarenka and Max Mirnyi (Belarus)
Silver: Laura Robson and Andy Murray (GB)
Bronze: Lisa Raymond and Mike Bryan (USA)

Men’s Singles

Gold: Andy Murray (GB)
Silver: Roger Federer (Switzerland)
Bronze: Juan Martin del Potro (Argentina)

Men’s Doubles

Gold: Bob and Mike Bryan (USA)
Silver: Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Michael Llodra (France)
Bronze: Richard Gasquet and Julien Benneteau (France)

Photos: Getty Images, Reuters

Even worse than the Spanish Olympic kit, but by the same brand: Bosco Sport.

Russian kit:

Russian Olympic tennis team:
Alex Bogomolov JR, Nikolay Davydenko, Maria Kirilenko, Ekaterina Makarova, Nadia Petrova, Maria Sharapova, Dmitry Tursunov, Elena Vesnina, Mikhail Youzhny, Vera Zvonareva

Ukrainian kit:

Ukrainian Olympic tennis team:
Alona Bondarenko, Kateryna Bondarenko, Sergiy Stakhovsky

This is the second part of my Day 10 recap.

Court Suzanne Lenglen, fifth set of the fourth round match between Murray and Troicki.

Court Suzanne Lenglen

Court Suzanne Lenglen

I must be an idiot but I always thought that when you’re injured you’re supposed to shorten up the points. Apparently not. By the way, Murray didn’t seem injured at all and he can thank Troicki who simply gave him the match.

Andy Murray

Andy Murray

Andy Murray

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