Andy Murray, Roland Garros 2016

Today I’ve got tickets for court Lenglen. In the first match of the day, 2014 Roland Garros finalist Simona Halep rallied from one set down to beat Naomi Osaka 4-6 6-2 6-3.

The view from my seat, row 25:

Court Suzanne Lenglen

Court Suzanne Lenglen

Court Suzanne Lenglen

In Roland Garros’ newspaper today, the extraordinary story of Marcel Bernard, who took the singles title here in 1946. He was at first only committed in the mixed doubles and mens doubles competitions, but took part to the singles tournament due to the withdrawal of his his mixed doubles partner. He defeated Jaroslav Drobny in the final in five sets. It was the first Roland Garros tournament after a 6-year hiatus due to World War II.
The Roland Garros mixed doubles trophy is now known as the “Coupe Marcel Bernard”. The stadium in which the Open du Nord is played is named after him.

Marcel Bernard (left) and Jaroslav Drobny:
Marcel Bernard and Jaroslav Drobny, Roland Garros 1946

Andy Murray defeats Ivo Karlovic 6-1 6-4 7-6

Will we see the grumpy player who struggled to beat Stepanek and Bourgue in the previous rounds or the champion who defeated Nadal in Madrid and Djokovic in Rome? From the first points on, it was obvious it would be the latter. Murray looked sharp and focused, and Karlovic was in danger on each of his service games. Murray dispatched Karlovic in three sets, his 7th win in seven meetings with the Croat. You can find the complete recap of the match here.
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After Ivan Lendl had cancelled his adidas deal in 1990, he signed a reported $20 million racket and clothing contract with Mizuno, a Japanese company.

Watch out one of Ivan’s commercial for Mizuno: I play to win
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adidas started producing tennis racquets in 1974. In the 70s, during the wood era, Ilie Nastase was adidas’ flagship player. But in the 80s, a new star emerged: Ivan Lendl.

Lendl rose quickly in the pro ranks, using a white Kneissl composite during 1980-1981. That frame was called the White Star Pro. In December 1980, Kneissl introduced the White Star Ivan Lendl which was similar to the White Star pro, but additionnally featured the component kevlar.
In 1981, Lendl signed with adidas and started to play with the GTX Pro model, which he would use through 1985. Lendl’s early GTX were paintjob Kneissl, as Kneissl produced the GTX pro frames for adidas in Austria.

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Photos by: nctt8

In 1986, Lendl started to play with the adidas GTX pro-T until 1990. In 1990, he signed a reported $20 million racket and clothing contract with Mizuno. After Lendl’s shift to Mizuno, adidas lost significant market share and retired from racquet production in 1992, but came back in 2008.

About adidas return to racquets market:
“When they were leaving the racket business back in the early 1990s, they were telling us it was no longer a good business to be in,” Lendl said. “Maybe the climate has changed. Still, I’m very surprised.”