All French Open 2012 posts are tagged French Open and are listed up below:

2012 French Open Rafael Nadal outfit

Roland Garros stadium:

Get behind the scenes at Roland Garros – part 1
Get behind the scenes at Roland Garros – part 2
Take a seat: court Suzanne Lenglen
Take a seat: court Philippe Chatrier
Today at Roland Garros: Court Philippe Chatrier

Recap and analysis:

Day 2 recap, part 1: Harrison, Haas, Hewitt…
Day 2 recap, part 2: Tomic, Raonic and Pennetta…
Ryan Harrison practice session
Day 3 recap, part 1: Young, Dulko, Suarez and Stosur…
Sam Stosur practice session
Flavia Pennetta and Maria Kirilenko practice session
Day 3 recap, part 2: Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Julia Goerges, Sloane Stephens…
Pics of Sam Stosur and Julia Goerges first round doubles match
Day 5 recap, part 1: PHM, Clément, Li Na…
Tommy Haas practice session
Li Na practice session
Day 5 recap, part 2: Pavlyuchenkova, Llodra, Querrey, Chardy …
Julia Goerges practice session on Day 5
Day 6 recap: Sharapova, Federer, Stosur, Azarenka, Del Potro, Tsonga…
Maria Sharapova practice session
Roger Federer practice session
Sam Stosur practice session on Day 6
Juan Martin Del Potro practice session on Day 6
Maria Sharapova completes the career Grand Slam
2012 French Open recap: the Good, the Bad, the King

Fashion and gear:

Fernando Verdasco’s adidas outfits for 2012
Nike Zoom Vapor Tour 9 SL – Roger Federer Roland Garros 2012
Nike Air Max Courtballistec 4.3 – Rafael Nadal Roland Garros 2012
Caroline Wozniacki adidas outfit for Roland Garros 2012
Rafael Nadal Nike outfit
Roger Federer Nike outfit
Maria Sharapova Nike dress and shoes
Victoria Azarenka Nike dress
Li Na Nike outfit
Serena Williams Nike dress and shoes
Novak Djokovic Roland Garros 2012 outfit
Ana Ivanovic adidas dress
Andy Murray adidas outfit
Gilles Simon adidas outfit
Andrea Petkovic adidas outfit
Arantxa Rus adidas outfit

A trip down memory lane:

1982: At the request of Monsieur Wilander
1982: first Grand Slam for Mats Wilander
1984 French Open: Ivan Lendl defeats John McEnroe
1985 French Open: Chris Evert defeats Martina Navratilova
1990 French Open: Opposites attract, Gomez defeats Agassi
1991 French Open final: Jim Courier defeats Andre Agassi
Steffi Graf – Martina Hingis Roland Garros 1999
1999 French Open: Agassi-Graf, two days, one destiny
A look back at Roland Garros 2011

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Follow Amélie Mauresmo: @AmeMauresmo

When Novak Djokovic cut his ties with adidas in favour of agreeing a 10-year deal with Sergio Tacchini in November 2009, many saw the announcement as being no great loss. Particularly when you consider that a player of similar stature (at the time) Britain’s Andy Murray signed a long-term, multi-million pound deal with adidas shortly after. Since that point however, the man they call ‘Nole’ has been formidable, blitzing all those that come before him, winning Grand Slam titles in the process and building a huge global following. In contrast, Andy Murray has now lost in three Grand Slam finals, and until recently has been struggling for form, casting doubt over his potential to achieve his ultimate ambition of winning a major championships.

For now however, the focus has to be on Djokovic and indeed Sergio Tacchini. The Chinese-owned brand has quite rightly bombarded the homepage of its central website with images of the tennis superstar, highlighting his position as global ambassador, referencing his third Australian Open win and even launching his own clothing line. A recent post I published on the Insight Sport blog touched upon the benefits of sponsors of major sporting events such as the Olympic Games aligning themselves with a portfolio of athletes as opposed to ‘putting all their eggs in one basket’ so to speak and focusing on one specific athlete – for a company the size of Sergio Tacchini it has little choice.

With an annual revenue of less than $50 million, the sportswear brand is reliant on Djokovic continuing his excellent form, whilst it can also fall back on his long term tennis heritage, having sponsored players such as John McEnroe, Pat Cash, Martina Hingis and Goran Ivanisevic in past times. In comparison, the likes of adidas and Nike are in a different league, with both sponsoring a number of high profile tennis stars across the men’s and women’s games. And with Nike recording revenues of $2.55 billion and the adidas $4.7 billion in Q3, 2011. At this point, one can only wonder at the impact Novak Djokovic could have had as an ambassador for adidas should it have retained the World Number one as an ambassador.

However all is not lost…

Adopting a long-term perspective, should Britain’s number one win a Grand Slam – he is showing signs of improvement under new coach Ivan Lendl – the effect could go beyond that of his close friend and nemesis. Given his nationality and the popularity of tennis in the UK, his appeal would reach out not only across his homeland, but also globally, given his delay in achieving what many say is his destiny. Djokovic meanwhile has hit his mesmeric heights now, there is evidence to suggest that Murray is slowly closing the gap, whilst Djokovic’s relatively small home market of Serbia is not one of significant importance to the adidas brand.

For now, one thing is clear, Djokovic is the driving force in men’s tennis, and deserves the accolades he is receiving, and Sergio Tacchini is revelling in his successes. Until Andy Murray wins a Slam, adidas must simply face up to the fact that they missed a trick in releasing Djokovic, although should that day arrive where Murray comes face to face with destiny, expect adidas to turn around and give a big ‘I told you so’ in the direction of those who doubted.

By Andreas Plastiras

Check out Andreas’ blog Snap Shot Sport

More than 11 years after her celebrated and hyped professional debut as a 14-year-old, Jennifer Capriati finally moves to the n°1 ranking for the first time.
Capriati, the reigning Australian and French Open champion and the only woman to reach the semifinals of all four Grand Slams during the year, ends Martina Hingis‘ 73-week hold of the top ranking.

When I look back on my career, I am very proud of the two Grand Slams I won this year and, obviously, getting to n°1.

I am also proud to be able to come back from everything that has happened in my life and just to enjoy tennis and play this well. This shows eveybody that it’s never too late to realize your talent, or your dream. If you think positive and believe in yourself, good things are going to come.

Martina Hingis reached the final twice at Roland Garros: in 1997 (lost to Iva Majoli) and in 1999, the unforgettable final against Steffi Graf. This year she came back to play the Trophée des Légendes with Lindsay Davenport.

Here are a few pics of Martina on Saturday during the match Davenport/Hingis vs Temesvari/Testud:

Martina Hingis, Lindsay Davenport and Andrea Temesvari

Martina Hingis, Lindsay Davenport, Andrea Temesvari, Sandrine Testud

Martina Hingis

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