The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club:

Wimbledon guided tour – part 1
Wimbledon guided tour – part 2
Wimbledon Centre Court roof
Court 3 : a new Show Court at Wimbledon
Waiting in the Queue to Wimbledon
Wimbledon Museum: The Queue exhibition
The Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum: Player Memorabilia

Fashion and gear:

Rafael Nadal Nike outfit
Roger Federer Nike outfit
Maria Sharapova Nike dress
Serena Williams Nike dress
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga adidas outfit
Andy Murray adidas outfit
Ana Ivanovic adidas dress
Novak Djokovic Uniqlo outfit

Marketing

Wimbledon 2012 Sponsorship Activation

A trip down memory lane:

Wimbledon Trivia
Wimbledon past champions: stats and records
Wimbledon ‘s biggest upsets
Wimbledon memories: Mrs Blanche Bingley Hillyard
Wimbledon memories: Charlotte Cooper Sterry
Wimbledon memories: Dora Boothby
Wimbledon 1969: Laver’s getting beat by an Indian
Rod Laver – John Newcombe Wimbledon 1969
Bjorn Borg – Ilie Nastase Wimbledon 1976
Virginia Wade, Britain’s last Wimbledon champion
1981: First Wimbledon title for McEnroe
1982: Jimmy Connors defeats John McEnroe
1984: John McEnroe defeats Jimmy Connors
Wimbledon 1991: the first Middle Sunday
1992: first Grand Slam for Andre Agassi
1993: Pete Sampras defeats Jim Courier
2000 Wimbledon SF: Pat Rafter defeats Andre Agassi
2000 Wimbledon Final: Pete Sampras defeats Pat Rafter
2001 Wimbledon 4th round: Federer defeats Sampras
Wimbledon 2010: Rafael Nadal defeats Tomas Berdych
The Spirit of Wimbledon: a 4-part documentary by Rolex retracing Wimbledon history

Recap and analysis:

Polls:

Wimbledon 2013 champion?

  • Rafael Nadal (31%, 48 Votes)
  • Roger Federer (29%, 45 Votes)
  • Novak Djokovic (18%, 28 Votes)
  • Andy Murray (18%, 28 Votes)
  • Juan Martin Del Potro (1%, 2 Votes)
  • David Ferrer (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Tomas Berdych (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Other (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 154

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Wimbledon 2013 champion?

  • Serena Williams (56%, 78 Votes)
  • Maria Sharapova (19%, 26 Votes)
  • Victoria Azarenka (16%, 23 Votes)
  • Other (5%, 7 Votes)
  • Agnieszka Radwanska (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Petra Kvitova (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Li Na (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Angelique Kerber (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Sara Errani (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 140

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Bored by this rainy day at Roland Garros? Check out Roland Garros avec John McEnroe, a film by Gil De Kermadec:

Roland Garros visitor’s guide:

How to buy Roland Garros tickets
Roland Garros 2013 FAQ
Get behind the scenes at Roland Garros – part 1
Get behind the scenes at Roland Garros – part 2
Take a seat: court Suzanne Lenglen
Take a seat: court Philippe Chatrier
Today at Roland Garros: Court Philippe Chatrier
Longines Smash Corner
Roland Garros store
Beach tennis and mini tennis at Roland Garros

Fashion and gear:

Rafael Nadal Nike outfit preview
Rafael Nadal Nike outfit
Nadal Nike Air Max Courtballistec 4.3
Roger Federer Nike outfit preview
Roger Federer Nike outfit
Federer Nike Zoom Vapor 9 Tour
Maria Sharapova Nike outfit
Serena Williams Nike outfit
Victoria Azarenka Nike outfit
Li Na Nike outfit
Juan Martin Del Potro Nike outfit
Caroline Wozniacki adidas dress
Andrea Petkovic adidas outfit
Ana Ivanovic adidas outfit
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga adidas outfit
Novak Djokovic Uniqlo outfit
Venus Williams dress by EleVen
Maria Sharapova footwear collection

A trip down memory lane:

1956: First time at Roland Garros for Rod Laver
1969: Rod Laver defeats Ken Rosewall
1982: At the request of Monsieur Wilander
1982: first Grand Slam for Mats Wilander
1984 French Open: Ivan Lendl defeats John McEnroe
1985 French Open: Chris Evert defeats Martina Navratilova
1990 French Open: Opposites attract, Gomez defeats Agassi
1991 French Open final: Jim Courier defeats Andre Agassi
Steffi Graf – Martina Hingis Roland Garros 1999
1999 French Open: Agassi-Graf, two days, one destiny
2005: Rafael Nadal defeats Mariano Puerta
2008: Rafael Nadal defeats Roger Federer
A look back at Roland Garros 2011

Recap and analysis:

Heading to Roland Garros
Day 1 recap part 1: Ana Ivanovic, Serena Williams and Roger Federer
Day 1 recap part 2: Laura Robson, Ernests Gulbis, Tommy Haas…
Pics of Serena Williams first round match
Pics of Roger Federer first round match
Pics of Ana Ivanovic first round match
Day 2 recap: Mikhail Youzhny, John Isner, Svetlana Kuznetsova…
Tommy Robredo practice session

Polls:

Roland Garros 2013 men's winner?

  • Rafael Nadal (49%, 91 Votes)
  • Novak Djokovic (26%, 48 Votes)
  • Roger Federer (17%, 31 Votes)
  • Juan Martin Del Potro (3%, 5 Votes)
  • Other (2%, 3 Votes)
  • David Ferrer (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Tomas Berdych (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Andy Murray (1%, 1 Votes)

Total Voters: 185

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Roland Garros 2013 women's winner?

  • Serena Williams (41%, 66 Votes)
  • Maria Sharapova (35%, 56 Votes)
  • Victoria Azarenka (9%, 15 Votes)
  • Other (4%, 7 Votes)
  • Li Na (3%, 5 Votes)
  • Sam Stosur (3%, 5 Votes)
  • Agniezska Radwanska (2%, 3 Votes)
  • Angelique Kerber (2%, 3 Votes)
  • Petra Kvitova (1%, 2 Votes)

Total Voters: 162

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Which French player has the best chance to win RG 2013?

  • Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (66%, 56 Votes)
  • Richard Gasquet (21%, 18 Votes)
  • Benoit Paire (6%, 5 Votes)
  • Other (5%, 4 Votes)
  • Gilles Simon (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Paul Henri Mathieu (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Jérémy Chardy (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Julien Benneteau (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Michael Llodra (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 85

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Remember all those great Nike ads featuring John McEnroe, Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras?

So now watch this new Nike commercial featuring Federer and … a fly:

If it’s supposed to be funny it’s not, must be the worst Nike commercial ever.

Even worst, Nike Federer vs Fly commercial looks a lot like this Babolat/Roddick video that dates back to 2010:

Enjoy Mauro’s view on the EdbergMcEnroe final at Stockholm’s Kings of Tennis:

Who didn’t think that the worst was going to happen again? When Stefan Edberg was one set and a break up in the Kings of Tennis final against John McEnroe and started to walk with a limp, repeatedly touching his left thigh and asking for the physio, we all went back to the 2012 Zurich final against Carlos Moya, when the same kind of injury prevented him from winning the title with the match that seemed already over.

The fact that this time he went all the way in front of his home crowd, against an opponent 6 years his senior (that had struggled himself with a neck injury in the match before against Henri Leconte) can’t make us forget that almost twenty years have gone by since Stefan’s professional days and, inevitably, playing serve & volley tennis for entire matches in consecutive days on fast surfaces (stressing out articulations and muscles) is getting increasingly demanding for his body.

Yet it remains a show! Watching the final, all the lovers of vintage tennis can’t help noticing and appreciating the variety that Stefan can give his shots. When you see him use three different spins on three consecutive serves, you immediately think that, even though racquets and strings have developed becoming a technological weapon today, an alternative to exclusively power tennis would still be possible if the player’s arm and hand are educated and know the game’s history and secrets.

When you see two monsters like Stefan Edberg and John McEnroe apply today the same kind of strategies they played twenty years and more ago, you think that, it’s true, surfaces have been slowed down, but no way this is a factor to completely erase net play from the game.

At every interview Stefan keeps repeating that, had he played tennis today, he wouldn’t have served and volleyed at 90 per cent, but only half of the times. Still, when he enters the court, it’s so evident that the net remains an irresistible attraction for him. His touch is unchanged and the decreased speed makes it even more enjoyable to watch. His right side seems even improved and lower speeds this time can’t be the reason, because Stefan’s forehand has always been a counterpunching shot that gave him more troubles right when it was him who had to generate the power.

In the Stockholm final, instead, he looked unusually sharp on this shot, while he unexpectedly missed several backhand crosscourt passings.

For a good hour the final was top-level tennis. Since Stefan’s injury, I would say from the fourth game of the second set on, it went down. The two thousand spectators of the Stockholm Waterfront Congress Centre didn’t notice it. They were delighted, because the loss of quality was balanced by an enthralling fight in the second half of the match.

At the end the audience were all on their feet. But the real question is: how can an Edberg vs McEnroe final, even today, be watched by just two thousand spectators? An event that, I’m sure, would have filled the Royal Albert Hall in London (5.500 seats) or the Stade de Coubertin in Paris (5.000)… And, remember, last June there were 10.000 persons in Halle (which is not a capital city) to watch four tennis glories, right in the Sunday of the French Open final…

The Waterfront Congress Centre may surely be the tennis facility that Stockholm was waiting for. It is central, modern and multifunctional. But at the same time, it is the clear evidence of the downsizing of tennis in Sweden. In the ’80s and early ’90s the Stockholm Open was played at the Globe Arena (14.000), then, from 1996, it moved to the Kungliga Tennishallen (5.000). Now, a senior event that puts together two former Swedish world number ones (and Borg was in the stands) plus two more Swedish top ten players and a world sports star like John McEnroe is hosted in a much smaller stadium. And it’s not sold-out…

The news of the winner has barely found some space on the Swedish most important online media, where the sport pages are now almost completely filled with ice hockey. It looks like the Kings of Tennis, more than revitalizing tennis in Sweden, reminds the Vikings of a past that can no longer be.

Visit Mauro’s website: STE…fans

Photo by Tim Edwards

Risk tennis a lost art form

Earlier this year I wrote an article about the pace of indoor surfaces and the demise of indoor carpet on the ATP and WTA tours. (see article here) Quick indoor carpet has been completely phased out in favour of medium paced indoor hardcourts based on the plexicushion surface. The slowing down in surfaces has led to a convergence in style of play and allowed defensive minded players to get to the very top of the game and stay there.

Recently Roger Federer called for surfaces to speeded up once again “It’s an easy fix. Just make quicker courts, then it’s hard to defend,” Federer said. “Attacking style is more important. It’s only on this type of slow courts that you can defend the way we are all doing right now.”

Roger Federer

When I spoke to the ATP spokesman back in February, he clearly gave the view the surfaces were slowed down and carpet phased out because there were too many complaints that the big serve was dominating tennis. That is a pity because my article clearly dispelled the myth that faster surfaces were only dominated by big servers, I pointed out that many baseliners loved the quicker surfaces.

Players like Ivan Lendl won over 30 tournaments on indoor carpet, much more tournaments on one surface than most players win in an entire career. Lendl won 5 year end Masters titles (ATP World Tour) and played in 8 straight finals between 1982 and 1989. Also Lendl won these titles against the likes of John McEnroe, Boris Becker, and Stefan Edberg.

Monica Seles was another player who excelled on indoor carpet, and yet both she and Lendl won multiple titles at the French Open, the slowest surface on tour. Martina Hingis also excelled on indoor carpet. In the mens game, Andre Agassi, Gustavo Kuerten, Lleyton Hewitt and Alex Corretja won the year end championships indoors whilst Jim Courier played in finals in 1991 and 1992 and Michael Chang in 1995.
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