Extract from On this day in tennis history by Randy Walker

Arthur Ashe becomes the first black player to win a title in the apartheid nation of South Africa winning the doubles title at the South African Open with Tom Okker, defeating Lew Hoad and Bob Maud 6-2 4-6 6-2 6-4 in the final.
After being denied a visa based on his anti-apartheid views, Ashe is permitted to play in the event by the South African government. Ashe requests to tournament officials that the bleacher seating not be segregatedd during the tournament, but his wishes are not granted.
Ashe loses the singles final the day before to Jimmy Connors 6-4 7-6 6-3. Chris Evert wins the women’s title defeating Evonne Goolagong 6-3 6-3.

Enjoy this 4-part Rolex documentary retracing Wimbledon’s history from Suzanne Lenglen to Rod Laver to Roger Federer. A must-see for every tennis fan.

Part 1 (1877-1939): the foundations of Wimbledon

Suzanne Lenglen, designer Ted Tinling, Gussie Moran, Bill Tilden, Jean Borotra, Henri Cochet, René Lacoste, Don Budge, Helen Wills, Fred Perry

Part 2 (1945-1977): a brand new era

Virginia Wade, Jack Kramer, Maureen Connolly, Althea Gibson, Ann Jones, Louise Brough, Harry Hopman, Ken McGregor, Rod Laver, Frank Sedgman, Cliff Drysdale, WCT, Handsome Eight, Ken Rosewall, Margaret Court, Evonne Goolagong, Billie Jean King

Part 3 (1978-1999): the Golden Era

Bjorn Borg, John McEnroe, Chris Evert, Martina Navatilova, Steffi Graf, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg, Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi

Part 4 (2000-2011): Sampras, Federer, Venus and Serena

Pete Sampras, Pat Rafter, Roger Federer, Goran Ivanisevic, Venus Williams, Serena Williams, Maria Sharapova, Rafael Nadal, Andy Roddick, John Isner, Nicolas Mahut

2011 US Open by the numbers

US Open Men's Final - 027

4

For the fourth consecutive year, the men’s final has been played on Monday.

6

Sixth defeat in a row for Nadal against Djokovic. All in 2011 and all in finals. Nadal still leads the overall series 16-13.
It would be time to have a game plan and stop playing again and again on Djokovic’s backhand, Nadal. (check out Nadal-Djokovic head-to-head here).

64

Victories for Djokovic in 2011, against two losses.

31

Sam Stosur ended a 31-year drought for Australian women when she became the first since Evonne Goolagong at Wimbledon in 1980, to capture a Grand Slam on Monday.
Goolagong didn’t wait long to congratulate her, texting Sam Stosur moments after her US Open win to say: “Twinkletoes, you finally have got what you deserved”
Next challenge for Sam: win the Australian Open in front of her home crowd. Last Aussie to capture the title is Chris O’Neil who surprised everybody for her one and only career title at the Open in 1978.

2000

Serena can keep behaving like an asshole: her latest outburst during the US Open final cost her only $2000. Her behavior is simply indefensible.
Chris Evert said she “was so surprised how disrespectful and rude” Williams was to umpire Eva Asderaki and called the $2,000 hit “like dinner for Serena.”
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After that first set I kind of sat down and I could feel my heart pounding out of my chest, and I thought, Okay, I’m a set up now; I’ve got a chance to win one out of the next two and I’ve got a chance.

What a surprise at Flushing Meadows! Sam Stosur stunned Serena Williams 6-2 6-3 to capture her first Grand Slam title.
Sam totally overwhelmed Serena from first point on.
She is the first Australian woman to win a Grand Slam since Evonne Goolagong (Wimbledon 1980) and the first US Open since Margaret Smith Court in 1973.

Congrats to Sam for her well deserved victory!

Sam Stosur, 2011 US Open champion

Excerpts of The 100 greatest days in New York sports by Stuart Miller

“She turned head because she was a pretty, young thing, but she captivated everyone because of her gutsy play and icy determination.
Chris Evert was not the first teen prodigy, but in an era filled with veterans like Billie Jean King and Margaret Court, along with one-handed backhands, serve and volley tactics, and uncertainty about the viability of the women’s tour, Evert revolutionized the women’s game.

On September 4, 1971, in her first Open at Forest Hills, this 16 years old perky blonde with a 12 tournaments, 44 match winning streak landed on the stadium court for her second round match against fourth seed Mary Ann Eisel.
Her wins had largely been against lesser lights or on clay, which favored her relentless baseline game. But on grass against one of the surface’s top players, she was unable to simply grind down her opponent. And so, Evert, an amateur who had taken 2 weeks off from high school in Fort Lauderdale for this tournament, seemed headed for home.

She lost a close first set 6-4 and trailed 6-5 in the second when Eisel stockpiled 3 match points. As television announcers Bud Collins and Jack Kramer gave her a warm ‘nice try kid’ sendoff, Evert suddenly showed Forest Hills and a national television audience that she had the makings of a champion.
On Eisel’s first effort, Evert set the tone, whistling a big backhand service return down the line. Then on a second serve, Evert mashed a crosscourt forehand passing shot. Evert easily captured the tiebreaker then crushed her demoralized foe 6-1 in the third set.

King who’d come over to watch the rookie, was impressed by how she handled the pressure, saying later:

A star was born in my eyes that match


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