Olympic gold medallist Andy Murray

From Andy Murray’s autobiography, Seventy-Seven

The atmosphere on finals day was nerve-tingling once again. So many were decked out in Union Jack colours, every spectator seemed to have a flag. I would imagine for Roger, the fact that the fans wee so obviously in my corner must have been a shock for him. He’s been on that court so many times and the British have great affection for him. The Wimbledon final was fairly split, but in the Olympics the support for me was amazing. When the crowd is behind you, it does make a huge difference – it makes you perform better, the opponent can feel intimidated, and when things are going well it is easier to carry that momentum through a match. Against Roger, this time, I didn’t let up at all.

The middle part of the match was, without doubt, the best I’d played in my career to that point. I’m not saying Roger played his best match, but the support of the crowd and the momentum from everyone else in every other sport doing so well seemed to carry me along. I just felt right the whole match.
I finished it with three big serves in a row. I think he only got a racket on a couple of them. I was serving gor the biggest title of my career and I served as well as I had ever done.

In the moments after a special match like this there are certain people you want to be with. Not everyone got to see what I was really like after Wimbledon, even though Kim and my mum and dad would have known how I was feeling. They had seen me lose so many of those matches before. That made me doubt myself – and maybe they doubted me as well – so it was great to be able to spend two or three seconds with them straight after I’d won. They knew all the work that went into the victory and how many tough losses there had been along the way. Out of all the things that happened to me in 2012, winning the gold medal was the proudest moment.

There had been four weeks to the day between one of the hardest moments of my life and one of the most fulfilling. Roger was involved in both of them and he made them special because he’s arguably the greatest of all time.

I was nervous before the final of the Olympics but I don’t remember feeling the same fear as before at Wimbledon. Maybe when I was playing on Centre Court before I felt I had to behave myself, because everyone was watching me and maybe I felt a bit self-conscious. People weren’t necessarily waiting for me to slip up but if I did, somebody would have something to say about it and everyone would have an opinion on what I had or hadn’t done. But after Wimbledon, people accepted my flaws – and I have loads of them. People seemed to see me for what I am and how I express myself, not judge me on what I should or shoukdn’t do.

I remember shaking my head when I was up there on the podium, ready to receive the medal. All of the guys in my team were there and the podiums were set up so that I was facing them. Seeing them all smiling, and everyone looking so proud, amde me feel wonderful. Yes, I was proud of myself, but when I saw everyone smiling and everyone singing the national anthem, I got a real sense of togetherness.
Maybe we don’t show enough of that in our country, and maybe the result is that sometimes we don’t get a sense that everyone can pull together for the same cause. When I saw Sir Chris Hoy holding the flag at the opening ceremony and he was completely blubbing the whole way around, I realised that you don’t get that in other competitions and that the London Olympics was really specials.

Check out the whole match here.

#votemurray

2012 has been a tremenduous year for Andy Murray: after making the Wimbledon final and clinching Olympic gold, he captured his elusive first Grand Slam title at the US Open, beating Novak Djokovic in the final.

You can now help him become BBC Sports Personality of the year. The voting for the award is by phone and all the details are on the BBC website.
Other contenders include: Ben Ainslie, Bradley Wiggins, Chris Hoy, David Weir, Ellie Simmonds, Jessica Ennis, Katherine Grainger, Mo Farah, Nicola Adams, Rory McIlroy and Sarah Storey.

During London 2012, adidas has been working with UK free paper Metro, creating cover wraps for each day of the Games that feature portraits of Team GB athletes by a selection of artists and illustrators.

The campaign runs for the 17 days of the Games.

Metro cover featuring Peter Reed:

Team GB:

Andy Murray:

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adidas GB Olympic kit

adidas, Official Sportswear Partner of Team GB and Paralympics GB presented the team kit that will be worn by 500 Olympic and 350 Paralympic British athletes at the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

The kit, designed by Stella McCartney, was revealed in spectacular style at the Tower of London where over 30 athletes including Jessica Ennis, Phillips Idowu and Ellie Simmonds showcased the performance range including competition kit, training wear, the presentation suit, footwear and accessories.

adidas GB Olympic kit

adidas GB Olympic kit

Over two years in the making, McCartney’s design of the kit focusses on the Union flag:

“The first place to start on a project like this is to look at the Union flag. For me it’s one of the most beautiful flags in the world and it was important for me to stay true to that iconic design but also to modernise it and present it in a contemporary way. Ultimately, we wanted the athletes to feel like a team and be proud with the identity we created.”

Judging by the comments on her facebook page, I’m not the only one to dislike this:
The Union flag is RED, WHITE & BLUE………not blue, white and blue!!
The Union Jack did not need re-designing. Or re-interpreting.
I’d freak if someone messed with my (Irish) tricolour the way the Union Jack was used on this kit. I’m shocked as artistic licence is one thing but changing a national flag is a complete other. It really should be redone out of respect.
A kid would have come up with something more exciting …. utter crap!
Why the fuck didnt someone who knows the British flags design this?
The design is almost exactly the same as the US Postal Service, how dare you ruin our heritage this way, what were you thinking by dismissing the red of England?

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