Rafa Nadal at practice

Today was my first day at Roland Garros. I arrived just in time to watch the end of Rafa‘s training with uncle Toni on court Suzanne Lenglen. Rafa mostly worked on his backhand and drop shots. Here are a few pictures, enjoy!

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal
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Nadal - Federer, 2009 Australian Open

Excerpt of Rafael Nadal‘s autobiography Rafa:

“Going into the Australian Open in 2009, I felt my chances of winning were as good as they had been at Wimbledon six months earlier. I had, in other words, a good chance. The ball bounces higher than it does at the US Open, so it doesn’t fly so fast and it takes my topspin well. What I hadn’t reckoned on was a semifinal like the one I had against my friend and fellow Spaniard Fernando Verdasco. I won, in the end, but I had to battle so hard and was left so physically destroyed by the end of it. For most of the one and a half day of preparation I had for the final against Federer, I was convinced I had absolutely no chance of winning. The only time I’d felt like that before a Grand Slam final was at Wimbledon in 2006, but that was because I did not believe, in my heart of heats, that winning was an option.
Before the Australian Open final in 2009 it was my body that rebelled, begging me to call a halt. It didn’t cross my mind to pull out of the match but the result I anticipated, and for which I strove mentally to prepare myself, was a 6-1 6-2 6-2 defeat.

The semifinal I played against Verdasco was the longest match in Australian Open history. It was incredibly tight every step of the way, with him playing spectacularly, hitting an extraordinarily high percentage of winners. But I somehow held on, on the defense but making few erors, and after 5h14, I won 6-7 6-4 7-6 6-7 6-4. It was so hot on court that the two of us rushed to drape ice packs around our necks and shoulders in the breaks between games. In the very last game, just before the very last point, my eyes filled with tears. I wasn’t crying because I sensed defeat, or even victory, but as a response to the sheer excruciating tension of it all. I had lost the fourth set on a tie break, and that in a game so tense and in such conditions, would have devastating had I not been able to call on every last reserve of mental strength I’d accumulated over fifteen years of relentless competition. I was able to put that blow behind me and begin the fifth believing I still had it in me to win.

The chance finally arrived with me 5-4 and 0-40 up on Verdasco’s serve. That should have been it, with three match points, but it wasn’t quite. I lost both the first and second points. That was when it all got too much for me and I broke down; that was where the armor plating fell away and the warrior Rafa Nadal, who tennis fans think they know, revealed as the vulnerable, human Rafael.
The one person who didn’t see it was Verdasco. Either that or he was in even worse shape than I was. Because his nerves got the better of him too. In a moment of incredible good luck for me (and terrible luck for him), he double faulted, handing me victory without me having to hit a shot. Both of us fell flat on our backs, ready to expire of physical and nervous exhaustion, but it was me who made it up first, stumbling forward and stepping over the net to embrace Fernando and tell him it was a match neither of us had deserved to lose.
The match ended at one in the morning, and i did not go to sleep till after five. […]

“No sooner had the match got under way than the the aches began to recede. So much so that I won the first game, breaking Federer’s serve. Then he broke me back, but as the games unfolded I found, to my great relief, that I wasn’t out of breath, and while my calves still felt heavy, there were no signs of the muscle cramps I had feared. And none materialized, despite the match going to five sets. In the end, as Titin says, pain is in the mind.

If you can control the mind, you can control the body

I lost the fourth set, as I had done against Verdasco, after going two sets to one up, but I came back, my determination bolstered and my spirit enhanced by the surprise and delight I felt at having made it as far as I had without falling apart. At 2-0 up in the fifth set I turned to where Toni, Carlos, Tuts and Titin were sitting and said, just loud enough so they could hear, in Mallorquin, ‘I’m going to win’. And I did. Toni had been right. Yes, I could. I won 7-5 3-6 7-6 3-6 6-2 and I was Australian Open champion; to my astonishment I had come back to life, and there it was, my third of the four Grand Slam titles, now my sixth overall.”

Rafael Nadal

Nadal's girlfriend

Carlos Costa

Stanislas Wawrinka

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal

Stanislas Wawrinka

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal

Stanislas Wawrinka

Toni Nadal

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal

Stanislas Wawrinka

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal

Thanks to Josh for the pictures

Hommage to Mats Wilander, Barcelona Open 2013

Organizers of the Barcelona Open paid tribute to Mats Wilander, who won the tournament three years in a row (1982, 1983, 1984) and lost twice in the final (1985, 1987).

Mats Wilander and Guillermo Vilas during the trophy ceremony in 1983:

1984 Vilas Wilander

1984 Entrega trofeo Wilander

Wilander received the award from Barcelona Open tournament director Albert Costa and Real Club Tenis Barcelona president Albert Agusti. Spanish champions Conchita Martinez, Alex Corretja, Carlos Costa and Feliciano Lopez were in attendance:

Homenaje a Mats Wilander
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Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal

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