Video by Emmanuel Pampuri

Andy Murray adidas Olympic kit

Andy Murray adidas Olympic kit

Andy Murray adidas Olympic kit

More on the GB Olympic kit designed by Stella McCartney

adidas GB Olympic kit

adidas, Official Sportswear Partner of Team GB and Paralympics GB presented the team kit that will be worn by 500 Olympic and 350 Paralympic British athletes at the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

The kit, designed by Stella McCartney, was revealed in spectacular style at the Tower of London where over 30 athletes including Jessica Ennis, Phillips Idowu and Ellie Simmonds showcased the performance range including competition kit, training wear, the presentation suit, footwear and accessories.

adidas GB Olympic kit

adidas GB Olympic kit

Over two years in the making, McCartney’s design of the kit focusses on the Union flag:

“The first place to start on a project like this is to look at the Union flag. For me it’s one of the most beautiful flags in the world and it was important for me to stay true to that iconic design but also to modernise it and present it in a contemporary way. Ultimately, we wanted the athletes to feel like a team and be proud with the identity we created.”

Judging by the comments on her facebook page, I’m not the only one to dislike this:
The Union flag is RED, WHITE & BLUE………not blue, white and blue!!
The Union Jack did not need re-designing. Or re-interpreting.
I’d freak if someone messed with my (Irish) tricolour the way the Union Jack was used on this kit. I’m shocked as artistic licence is one thing but changing a national flag is a complete other. It really should be redone out of respect.
A kid would have come up with something more exciting …. utter crap!
Why the fuck didnt someone who knows the British flags design this?
The design is almost exactly the same as the US Postal Service, how dare you ruin our heritage this way, what were you thinking by dismissing the red of England?

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HEAD has just launched a digital campaign for Andy Murray’s new YouTek™ IG Tour Radical racquet series.
The centrepiece of the campaign is a surprising film in which Andy thinks about what kind of creative job he could have had, if he hadn’t become a pro tennis player. Barber? Chef? Rockstar?

The making of:

As part of the campaign, HEAD invites tennis fans and social media users to win the opportunity to also switch their job and, for one day, have the chance to experience the life of a tennis pro – together with Andy Murray
of course. The competition is hosted exclusively on the HEAD Facebook site www.facebook.com/headtennis.

This kinda reminds me of this adidas commercial with Stefan Edberg:

What you think, which commercial do you prefer: HEAD/Murray or adidas/Edberg?

When Novak Djokovic cut his ties with adidas in favour of agreeing a 10-year deal with Sergio Tacchini in November 2009, many saw the announcement as being no great loss. Particularly when you consider that a player of similar stature (at the time) Britain’s Andy Murray signed a long-term, multi-million pound deal with adidas shortly after. Since that point however, the man they call ‘Nole’ has been formidable, blitzing all those that come before him, winning Grand Slam titles in the process and building a huge global following. In contrast, Andy Murray has now lost in three Grand Slam finals, and until recently has been struggling for form, casting doubt over his potential to achieve his ultimate ambition of winning a major championships.

For now however, the focus has to be on Djokovic and indeed Sergio Tacchini. The Chinese-owned brand has quite rightly bombarded the homepage of its central website with images of the tennis superstar, highlighting his position as global ambassador, referencing his third Australian Open win and even launching his own clothing line. A recent post I published on the Insight Sport blog touched upon the benefits of sponsors of major sporting events such as the Olympic Games aligning themselves with a portfolio of athletes as opposed to ‘putting all their eggs in one basket’ so to speak and focusing on one specific athlete – for a company the size of Sergio Tacchini it has little choice.

With an annual revenue of less than $50 million, the sportswear brand is reliant on Djokovic continuing his excellent form, whilst it can also fall back on his long term tennis heritage, having sponsored players such as John McEnroe, Pat Cash, Martina Hingis and Goran Ivanisevic in past times. In comparison, the likes of adidas and Nike are in a different league, with both sponsoring a number of high profile tennis stars across the men’s and women’s games. And with Nike recording revenues of $2.55 billion and the adidas $4.7 billion in Q3, 2011. At this point, one can only wonder at the impact Novak Djokovic could have had as an ambassador for adidas should it have retained the World Number one as an ambassador.

However all is not lost…

Adopting a long-term perspective, should Britain’s number one win a Grand Slam – he is showing signs of improvement under new coach Ivan Lendl – the effect could go beyond that of his close friend and nemesis. Given his nationality and the popularity of tennis in the UK, his appeal would reach out not only across his homeland, but also globally, given his delay in achieving what many say is his destiny. Djokovic meanwhile has hit his mesmeric heights now, there is evidence to suggest that Murray is slowly closing the gap, whilst Djokovic’s relatively small home market of Serbia is not one of significant importance to the adidas brand.

For now, one thing is clear, Djokovic is the driving force in men’s tennis, and deserves the accolades he is receiving, and Sergio Tacchini is revelling in his successes. Until Andy Murray wins a Slam, adidas must simply face up to the fact that they missed a trick in releasing Djokovic, although should that day arrive where Murray comes face to face with destiny, expect adidas to turn around and give a big ‘I told you so’ in the direction of those who doubted.

By Andreas Plastiras

Check out Andreas’ blog Snap Shot Sport