Rafael Nadal

Nike introduces Rafael Nadal‘s new shoe of choice: the NikeCourt Zoom Vapor Cage 4. The shoe incorporates the best qualities of two NikeCourt franchises: the durability of the Cage series with the speed of the Vapor line.
The shoe dons a purple, black and white colour scheme – patterned with hints of orange, indigo and red on its heel.

The NikeCourt Zoom Vapor Cage 4 releases December 15 on nike.com and at select retailers and Nike doors (The Grove and Nike Las Vegas).

Vegan Stan Smith shoes

“A few years ago my husband commissioned adidas to make me a special pair of vegetarian Stan Smiths for my birthday as he knew how much I love the iconic trainer,” she told the mag. “It got me thinking… so every time I saw the Adidas team, I’d say, ‘why can’t you make all your Stan Smiths veggie?’ It took a lot of convincing, and then finally we collaborated on the first pair of vegan Stan Smiths last year.”


Vegan Stan Smith shoes


Vegan Stan Smith shoes

Similar to the original design, the new vegan version of the iconic tennis shoes includes brightly colored rainbow laces. Instead of adidas stripes, they feature punched-out rainbow stars, and on one tongue there is a picture of 2-time Grand Slam champion Stan Smith, on the other, an image of Stella McCartney herself.
The new vegan Stan Smith will be available on December 2 at adidas.com and a select batch of retailers.

Wimbledon judges line

Hawkeye has been a big part of the ATP/WTA Tours for more than a decade now. As a decision review system, the technology hasn’t been completely flawless. The graphic failed to display during a Federer challenge against Tomas Berdych in the 2018 Australian Open, as a recent example.

However, on the whole, Hawkeye is functioning well.  In 99% of cases, it produces a quick, accurate response when a player challenges a call. In fact, Hawkeye is helping to overturn a fairly significant number of incorrect decisions. Although this isn’t tracked officially, the best of the best tend to get around 30-40% of their calls correct. This amounts to a pretty large number of decisions overturned when you consider the number of professional matches in which the system is used.

This raises an interesting question. We know that line umpires aren’t right 100% of the time – this is why Hawkeye exists. So why don’t we replace them with robots entirely?

Proponents of this move would have a pretty strong case: in theory, it would be impossible for an incorrect line call to be made. Tennis is quite different to a lot of other sports, in that so many decisions could technically be made without human judgment. While a robot can’t call a foul in soccer or basketball, it can tell where a ball has bounced and call it in or out.

Here are a few reasons why the ITF won’t replace line umpires with robots – not yet at least.

The speed of the decision

While Hawkeye currently tracks every single movement of the ball on the court, it does not make a decision unless it is told to.

Implementing the technology as a replacement for line umpires would require that it could make a judgment about every single ball, and display the decision in real-time. Currently, the technology isn’t quick enough to do this.

Of course, we could just wait for the system to process the data, and get a call a couple of seconds late. However, this would be a nightmare for players. Imagining having to continue playing while thinking to yourself “I’m sure that was out – Hawkeye will call it in a few seconds”.

At present, only human line umpires can keep up with the speed of the game. There’s no reason that this won’t change within the next decade, though.

The accuracy of the decision

The truth is, no-one knows how accurate Hawkeye actually is.

The average error of the system is 3.6mm, according to Hawkeye. However, researchers from Cardiff University found that the system could potentially be much less accurate. Hawkeye disputes their findings, but will not release any further information about the mathematics behind the decision-making process.

Even assuming that Hawkeye is right about the average error, the lack of transparency about how it works could leave a sour taste for many tennis fans. If the system were to replace line umpires altogether, the tennis community would need to know more about how Hawkeye works, and how accurate it actually is.

Plus, the system still isn’t accurate on clay, making it unusable for about a third of the ATP/WTA Pro Tours.

What if it breaks?

As the Federer/Berdych example showed, Hawkeye is going to break down sometimes. Berdych was also involved in an incident at the Australian Open in 2009, but this time on the receiving end. Hawkeye didn’t work when he challenged a call, supposedly due to a shadow making its way across the court.

If Hawkeye were to completely break down, and there weren’t any line umpires on hand, what would happen?

Because the system isn’t perfect, there would need to be some backup officials available. But if they came in and then proceeded to make a questionable call that could not be challenged, the player is going to feel quite hard done by.

Cost

Currently, Hawkeye costs around $70,000 per court to install. When compared to the cost of hiring line umpires, this might seem pretty reasonable. However, it’s important to remember that these systems also need constant maintenance and calibration to ensure they’re working correctly.

The cost of setting up a Hawkeye system will come down over time. However, the cost to use them to completely replace line umpires doesn’t yet make sense.

The future

The answer to the question “could the ITF replace line umpires with robots?” at the moment is probably no. The technology isn’t good enough as of yet to completely replace line umpires.

However, Hawkeye is always evolving. Within the next few decades, the system may reach a point where it makes economic and logical sense to stop using line umpires, at least in major tournaments.

The one thing that won’t change though is the concern that relying exclusively on Hawkeye will make the game too sterile. For many, the system we have right now achieves a nice balance between keeping the human element in the game, while eliminating a decent amount of incorrect calls.

Thanks to https://liftyourgame.net/

Photo credit: Kate Tann

Lake Geneva

After Prague in 2017 and Chicago last year, the city of Geneva in Switzerland will host the third edition of the Laver Cup, from 20 to 22 September.
Check out our Geneva travel guide to know more about the city, and if you attend the event, please share your comments and stories:

Read more:

Karolina Pliskova, Zhengzhou Open

World number 2 Karolina Pliskova didn’t drop a set all week, defeating Polona Hercog, Sofia Kenin, Ajla Tomljanovic and Petra Martic to win the inaugural edition of the Zhengzhou Open. She had lost to Martic in four of their previous five matches, but this time, she powered past the Croatian 6-3 6-2.

“My goal was to win this tournament…this is the best start to the Asian swing, I don’t think I could have done any better [this week],” said Pliskova.

The victory gives the Czech her tour-leading fourth title of the season (Brisbane, Rome, Eastbourne), her 15th overall. She also secures a fourth consecutive singles qualification at the WTA Finals, the longest active streak.

Read more:
Brisbane 2019: Karolina Pliskova outlasts Lesia Tsurenko

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