Novak Djokovic, 2017 French Open

Novak Djokovic has recently signed with Lacoste, and during the 2017 French Open, he makes his entrance on the Parisian clay courts displaying the Crocodile of his new Lacoste outfits.

Novak Djokovic’s signature is printed on the left sleeve of the polo shirt whose graphics are inspired by the lines of a tennis court. Varying touches of blue, white and red challenge the plain background in order to bring about a relaxed and quintessentially French style. White or black shorts come to complete the silhouette.

The Novak Djokovic collection is available in Lacoste boutiques.

Novak Djokovic outfit for Roland Garros 2017

Novak Djokovic outfit for Roland Garros 2017

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Novak Djokovic signs with Lacoste

Mansour Bahrami

The Legends Trophy (Trophée des Légendes) founded in 1997 by Mansour Bahrami brings together twenty-four of history’s greatest champions, grouped according to age in the two men’s draws, and twelve former women’s tennis stars. The event is a great opportunity to watch some former champions play in a friendly and funny atmosphere.
The Trophée des légendes is the unmissable event of the second week at Roland Garros.

Extract from Roland Garros Magazine’s interview with Mansour Bahrami:

RGM: How did you manage to set up the Trophée des Légendes?

To be honest, I pissed off Patrice Clerc, the director of Roland Garros (1984-2000) for three or four years before he accepted to let me organize the tournament. At the start he would tell me: “But you know that your rubbish old people’s tournament won’t work…” But we were playing all around the world, on a real circuit, the “Senior tour”, which had been created by Jimmy Connors in 1994. We were just sad to be left out of a great party which Roland Garros is. So I insisted and he said: “Mansour, I can’t take it anymore, you’re getting on my nerves… Let’s do this once, and maybe you’ll stop breaking my balls!” It was in 1997, and we’re now celebrating the twentieth edition.

RGM: Did it take time for you to completely rule in Patrice Clerc’s favor?

No, not really. There was this one first year, at the start, where two Spaniards were facing in the central court – but I can’t remember who exactly – and at the same time, we were playing a Trophée des légendes match on the Court 1 where we could host 4000 spectators. But the attendance numbers just sky-rocketed. As there wasn’t any ticket office, people were standing in the stairs, it was mad. There must have been 7000 people, with people standing outside waiting for spectators to leave. Meanwhile, there were only 600 spectators on the central court.

RGM: How do you explain the tournament’s success?

It’s pretty simple: the Trophée des légendes enables parents to take their children to tennis matches, and to tell them: “You see, Nastase, the player I’m talking about all day long, well, that’s him… he may be a little slower and fatter, but it’s really him.” (1)

RGM: What’s the atmosphere like during the tournament? Is it more a bunch of veterans gathering up to have a good time, or is it a competition like any other one?

It depends. Personally, I’m always, and I have always been relaxed. What’s important to me is seeing people walking out of the court with smiles on their faces. Others, like John McEnroe, are there to win it. If he loses, he’s just as sad as if he had lost the final of Roland Garros.

RGM: In the end, isn’t the Trophée des légendes one of the last tournaments where you can watch old school tennis, which can be fun but sometimes violent, with very strong personalities, far from today’s modern, muted and codified tennis?

Sometimes, Nastase would leave a tournament with less money than he had when he arrived: the price of his fines was higher than his earnings! I also remember Rod Laver, who would jump over the net to congratulate his opponent after a beautiful point… Do you think that would happen today? No. Why? Because we played at a time when there was no money at stake. We played for fun, and at the end of the tournament, we would win a pair of shoes… So yes it’s true, in a way, the Trophée des légendes enables this “free” spirit to live on in tennis. Today, you earn 4 million dollars if you win a Grand Slam tournament. The stakes are different.

RGM: Do you have a hard time organizing the Trophée des légendes?

Yeah, especially with John McEnroe (laughs). I’ll give you an exemple. One year, he told me that he wouldn’t be able to play the opening match. Of course, he told me that the day before the match. Well, I changed the whole program for the next day, and at midnight, he called me: “Mansour, I’ve thought about it, there is no way that I can play the second match, I’m playing the first one.” Obviously, it’s his way or no way. I had to spend the whole night phoning the others, on French, Swedish, Ecuadorian numbers… you name it! Just because of John’s stubbornness. I’ve recently told him that he couldn’t do that again. But I know he will…

RGM: Are there any favorites this year?

In the “young” category, the Spaniards who have just joined, like Carlos Moya and Juan Carlos Ferrero, are really good. Michaël Llodra could also surprise a few, for his first participation. In the category of players who are older than 45, Goran Ivanisevic and Sergi Bruguera are both equally impressive. But to be fair, we don’t really care about the level of the players. We invite players who are loved by the crowd. I’ve sometimes had to reject some guys who were unpopular.

(1) Nastase is not a very good example as he stopped playing the Trophée at least 5 years ago.
(2) We get his point but seriously, Borg, Connors and McEnroe among others were not playing for fun or for a pair of shoes. They were already signing big contracts. And today’s players don’t earn 4 million dollars for a Roland Garros victory.

Photo credit: Roland Garros Magazine

Read more:
Costa, Moya, Enqvist and Gaudio: fun under the sun
Past champions seen around the grounds at Roland Garros 2014
Roland Garros 2015: Clijsters and Navratilova pair to win the Legends Trophy

Roland Garros 2017

You managed to get French Open tickets? Here are a few tips to help you have the best of day at Roland Garros. Some advices might sound obvious, but forewarned is forearmed!

Be prepared

– verify you assigned correctly the name of the ticket holder on each ticket
– don’t forget your ID or passport with the name matching the name on your ticket
– check out the list of prohibited items: no cans, no glass bottles, no bottle over 1,5l, no stroller…
– check out weather predictions and prepare your bag accordingly
– bring some food and some water bottles you can refill at the drinking fountains
– print the order of play and write down the matches you’d like to watch
– have a look at the map of the grounds, and spot where the information stands, restrooms and drinking fountains are located
– follow @MyRG on twitter to know what’s going on inside the stadium

In the queue

– arrive early, you might have to queue a bit to enter the stadium (I had to queue 40 minutes the last days of the qualies)
– you can’t access directly your gate, you have to go through a security checkpoint before arriving at your gate and go through bag check, metal detector and body check
– be nice and polite with security guards, they’re only doing their job
– don’t jump the queue: 1. you’ll look like an asshole 2. people will make you understand (more or less nicely) where the queue starts 3. security guards will make you understand where the queue starts

In the stadium

– pick up Roland Garros daily program: it’s free, usually located near your entry gate and features the order of play, a map of the grounds, the schedule of animations…
– if you have any question, go to the information stand (near the Lenglen and the Chatrier)
– don’t lose your countermark ticket, especially in you have a seat on one of the show courts, you need to show it to the hostess to enter the court
– if you have a bit of time, have a walk around the grounds, you’ll enjoy the atmosphere and you might also see players at practice

Watching matches

– don’t take someone else’s seat. If someone took your seat, gently say: excusez-moi c’est ma place, and show him/her your seat number on your ticket
– put your mobile phone on silent
– if you’re a newbie tennis fan, I urge you to read Grandslamgal’s tennis spectator etiquette
– applaud the ball boys, linesmen and umpire when they enter the court
– you might be surprised that the crowd tends to boo and whistle a lot, sometimes you won’t understand why, and they probably don’t know why either
– the crowd likes its mexican wave too, sometimes they do la ola because they have fun and enjoy the match and sometimes because they are so bored they want to have some action
– don’t forget your bags when you leave your seat

To end up this post, a few usueful French words:
bonjour hello
s’il vous plaît please
merci thanks
droite right
gauche left
les toilettes restrooms
parlez vous anglais? do you speak English?
où est ma place s’il vous plaît? where is my seat please?

Enjoy your day at Roland Garros, and please share your story and pictures.

Richard Gasquet, Roland Garros 2017

Richard Gasquet stormed past Victor Estrella Burgos 6-1 6-0 6-4 to book a spot in the third round, and set up showdown with Gaël Monfils. Richard’s outfit is available on Le Coq Sportif’s website.

Richard Gasquet Roland Garros outfit

Richard Gasquet Roland Garros outfit

Richard Gasquet Roland Garros outfit

Follow our Roland Garros 2017 coverage.

Pablo Carreno Busta, Roland Garros 2017

20th seed Carreno Busta defeats Dimitrov 7-5 6-3 6-4 and reaches the last 16 at a Grand Slam for the first time. He’ll next face Milos Raonic was leading 6-1 1-0 when his opponent Guillermo Garcia-Lopez retired.

Check out a few pictures from Grigor’s practice on Saturday:

Grigor Dimitrov

Read more:
2017 clay court season: who won what
Carreno Busta wins Estoril Open