A lot of changes at Roland Garros this year: a new stadium entrance, a new Place des Mousquetaires and a new 5,000 seat court, Court Simonne Mathieu … but still no roof, we’ll have to wait at least till next year. I’m eager to discover all these new features in a few weeks time!
In the mean time, check out our Roland Garros guides, relieve some of the biggest defeats and triumphs of the past, and of course share your pictures, videos and stories!

Roland Garros visitor’s guide:

A trip down memory lane:

1956: First time at Roland Garros for Rod Laver

1960-1969:
Portrait of Manuel Santana, first Spaniard to capture a Grand Slam title in 1961
1967: Françoise Durr defeats Lesley Turner
1969: Rod Laver defeats Ken Rosewall

1970-1979:
Portrait of 6-time Roland Garros champion Bjorn Borg
Portrait of Adriano Panatta, the only player to beat Bjorn Borg at Roland Garros
1978: Virginia Ruzici defeats Mima Jausovec
1978: Bjorn Borg defeats Guillermo Vilas
Roland Garros 1978 in pictures

1980-1989:
1982: At the request of Monsieur Wilander
1982: first Grand Slam for Mats Wilander
1983: Yannick Noah defeats Mats Wilander
1984 French Open: Ivan Lendl defeats John McEnroe
1985 French Open: Chris Evert defeats Martina Navratilova
Roland Garros 1985: Mats Wilander defeats Ivan Lendl
Roland Garros 1988: bold Leconte swept aside by a Mats for all surfaces
Portrait of Natasha Zvereva, 1988 runner-up
Portrait of Arantxa Sanchez, 1989 French Open champion
Portrait of Michael Chang, 1989 French Open champion

1990-1999:
1990 French Open: Opposites attract, Gomez defeats Agassi
Roland Garros 1990: Defending champion Sanchez loses in the first round
Roland Garros 1990: Edberg and Becker lose in the first round
1991 French Open 3RD: Michael Chang defeats Jimmy Connors
1991 French Open final: Jim Courier defeats Andre Agassi
1996: An unflinching Edberg causes a grand upset
Roland Garros 1996: Pete Sampras run through the semi-finals
1997: Going ga-ga over Guga
Steffi Graf – Martina Hingis Roland Garros 1999

2000-2009:
2000: Mary Pierce finds peace and glory
2004: Coria vs Gaudio: the egotist vs the underdog
2005: Rafael Nadal defeats Mariano Puerta
2006: Nadal defeats Federer, wins second Roland Garros title

2010-2018:
A look back at Roland Garros 2011
A look back at Roland Garros 2014
A look back at Roland Garros 2015
3 days at Roland Garros 2017: Rafa, Andy, Petra and more
Day 2 at Roland Garros 2018: Djokovic, Nadal and Wozniacki

Pictures and Recaps:

Fashion and gear:

Polls:

Who will win Roland Garros 2019?

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Who will win Roland Garros 2019?

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Next Gen players


Before the start of the 2017 Indian Wells tournament, the ATP held an event featuring a few of the players in contention for the qualification to the inaugural edition of the Next Gen Finals. Fans had the chance to meet and hear from the future stars of the mens game.
Two years later, let’s have a look at their career so far.

Taylor Fritz

Age: 21 (28.10.1997)
Turned pro: 2015
Best ranking: 40
Titles: 0
Best Grand Slam result: 3R Australian Open 2019

Fritz became the youngest American to reach an ATP final since Michael Chang in 1988, when he advanced to the Memphis final in 2016 (l. to Nishikori, coached by Chang). Despite being ranked in the top 50, he doesn’t have any significant results or victories yet.

Read more:
Fourth Memphis title for Kei Nishikori
Sweetheart Sunday at the Memphis Open

Daniil Medvedev

Age: 23 (11.02.1996)
Turned pro: 2014
Best ranking: 15
Titles: 4
Best Grand Slam result: 4R Australian Open 2019

Medvedev had his big break last year with 3 titles in Sydney, Winston-Salem and Tokyo. He’s one of the in-form players of the start of the season: he reached the Brisbane final, captured his fourth career title in Sofia and advanced to the semifinals in Rotterdam. He’s also the only player to have taken a set to Djokovic at he recent Australian Open.
In 2018, Medvedev led the ATP Tour with 38 hard-court victories (38-15). It will be interesting to see how well he’ll do on clay.

Read more:
Sofia 2019: Daniil Medvedev cruises to the title
Brisbane 2019: Nishikori claims the title

Borna Coric

Age: 22 (14.11.1996)
Turned pro: 2013
Best ranking: 12
Titles: 2
Best Grand Slam result: 4R Australian Open 2019

He’s only 22 but it seems he’s already a veteran on the tour: aged 17 he defeated Nadal in Basel in 2014, he made his entry to the top 50 one year later, and won his first ATP title in Marrakesh in 2017.
Feeling his game and ranking weren’t evolving enough, Coric changed his whole team last year. Since then, he defeated Zverev and Federer in Halle for the biggest title of his career so far, and he defeated Del Potro and Federer en route to his first Masters 1000 final in Shanghai, where he lost to Novak Djokovic.
He also played an important part in Croatia’s Davis Cup triumph.

Karen Khachanov

Age: 22 (21.05.1996)
Turned pro: 2013
Best ranking: 11
Titles: 4
Best Grand Slam result: 4R Roland Garros 2018

Khachanov defeated 4 top 10 players to claim his first Masters 1000 trophy in Paris last November: John Isner, Alexander Zverev, Dominic Thiem and Novak Djokovic. It was his third indoor title in 2018 after also triumphing in Marseille and Moscow. As a result he was an alternate at the ATP Finals.
He struggled so far this year, with first round exits in Doha, Sofia, Rotterdam and Dubai.

Read more:
Open du Nord 2015: Khachanov wins the title

Reilly Opelka

Age: 21 (28.08.1997)
Turned pro: 2015
Best ranking: 56
Titles: 1
Best Grand Slam result: 2R Australian Open 2019

The new John Isner? Opelka, the tallest player on the circuit (2.11m), defeated Isner in the first round of the Australian Open and again a few weeks later in the semifinals of the New York Open, with both players combining to strike 81 aces (43 for Opelka) – an ATP record for a three-set match. He then defeated Canadian qualifier Brayden Schnur to capture maiden ATP title.

Stefan Kozlov

Age: 21 (01.02.1998)
Turned pro: 2013
Best ranking: 115
Titles: 0
Best Grand Slam result: Q3 Australian Open 2018

The only one so far who did not have his big breakthrough.
In 2014, Kozlov reached two junior Grand Slam finals, where he lost to Alexander Zverev at the Australian Open and Noah Rubin at Wimbledon. He won a few Challengers titles here and there but never managed to qualify for a Grand Slam’s main draw. His current ranking is around the 300th place.

Three more players, Alexander Zverev, Hyeon Chung and Frances Tiafoe were part of the Next Gen campaign:

Alexander Zverev

Age: 21 (20.04.1997)
Turned pro: 2013
Best ranking: 3
Titles: 10
Best Grand Slam result: QF Roland Garros 2018

The leader of the Next Gen players.
At 21, Federer had won 4 titles: an ATP 1000, 500 and two 250 events. At 21, Alexander Zverev has won 10 ATP titles, including four Masters 1000 along with two 500, five 250 and the 2018 ATP Tour Finals. But he has again and again underperformed at Grand Slams: 3 third round eliminations at majors last year and a defeat in straight sets to Milos Raonic in the fourth round of the Australian Open this year. He hired Ivan Lendl to help him progress, let’s see how far he can go.

Hyeon Chung

Age: 22 (19.05.1996)
Turned pro: 2014
Best ranking: 19
Titles: 0
Best Grand Slam result: SF Australian Open 2018

Winner of the inaugural NextGen ATP Finals in 2017, Chung reached the Australian Open semifinals a few months later thanks to wins over Zverev and Djokovic. He then reached the quarterfinals at Indian Wells (l. to Federer) and Miami (l. to eventual winner John Isner), and the Munich semifinals (l. to Zverev). He did not compete at Roland Garros or Wimbledon, and reached the second round of the 2018 US Open.
Plagued by injuries, he has an up and down career so far (he has a 1-4 record in 2019), and lacks a big weapon in his game.

Frances Tiafoe

Age: 21 (20.01.1998)
Turned pro: 2015
Best ranking: 29
Titles: 1
Best Grand Slam result: QF Australian Open 2019

The future of US tennis? Tiafoe became the youngest American to win an ATP title since Andy Roddick in 2002, when he claimed the Delray Beach title last year.
He made the quarter-finals at the Australian Open this year after wins over Kevin Anderson and Grigor Dimitrov, before being stopped by Nadal.

Read more:
Estoril 2018: Joao Sousa triumphs
Estoril Open 2018: Sousa and Tiafoe to clash in final

NextGen ATP players

A few more young players to watch:

Stefanos Tsitsipas

Age: 20 (12.08.1998)
Turned pro: 2016
Best ranking: 10
Titles: 2
Best Grand Slam result: SF Australian Open 2019

The talk of the season so far.
Winner of his first ATP trophy in Stockholm last year, Tsitsipas made the headlines with his win over Roger Federer en route to the 2019 Australian Open semifinals. He then captured the title in Marseille and advanced to the Dubai final (l. to Federer).
Currently second at the Race, he is the second Next Gen player (after Zverev) to reach the top 10, and many see him as a future world number one.

Dubai 2019: Federer and Tsitsipas face off in the final
Rogers Cup 2018: Nadal ends Tsitsipas run, wins 80th title
Stefanos Tsitsipas makes Greek tennis history in Barcelona

Andrey Rublev

Age: 21 (20.10.1997)
Turned pro: 2014
Best ranking: 31
Titles: 1
Best Grand Slam result: QF US Open 2017

Part of this new generation of Russian players who intend to follow the footsteps of their glorious countrymen Yevgeny Kafelnikov and Marat Safin.
In 2017, as a lucky loser, Rublev won maiden title in Umag, on clay. A few weeks later, he upset Grigor Dimitrov and David Goffin to become the youngest US Open quarterfinalist since Andy Roddick in 2001. He reached the Doha final (l. to Monfils) in 2018, but had to deal with a recurring back injury and fell out of the top 100.

Alex De Minaur

Age: 20 (17.02.1999)
Turned pro: 2015
Best ranking: 24
Titles: 1
Best Grand Slam result: 3R Australian Open 2019

The Australian was named the 2018 ATP Newcomer of the Year: he began the season at rank 208, and made his way to the Brisbane semifinals and Sydney final. He also reached the Washington final (l. to Zverev).
This year he captured his maiden ATP trophy in Sydney, defeating Gilles Simon in the semis and Andreas Seppi in the final. Is he the big champion Australia has been waiting since Lleyton Hewitt’s retirement?

Denis Shapovalov

Age: 19 (15.04.1999)
Turned pro: 2017
Best ranking: 23
Titles: 0
Best Grand Slam result: 4R US Open 2017

A player there’s been much talk about is Denis Shapovalov. He first made a name for himself when he defeated Del Potro and Nadal to reach the Rogers Cup semifinals in 2017. He reached the last 4 in Madrid last year.

Felix Auger-Aliassime

Age: 18 (08.08.2000)
Turned pro: 2017
Best ranking: 58
Titles: 0
Best Grand Slam result: Q2 Australian Open 2019

Another young Canadian is making wave these days: Felix Auger-Aliassime. He recently reached the Rio final after wins over Fognini, Garin, Munar and Cuevas and the Sao Paulo quarterfinals. rom number 185 to a career-high number 58 in the span of 10 months, Felix is one player to watch this year.

Who do you think will have the biggest career? Who will win a Grand Slam first?

Photo credit: Tony for Tennis Buzz

Dominic Thiem Roland Garros outfit

It’s that time of the year again, Roland Garros is just around the corner! Rafa Nadal will go for the undecima, a mind-blowing 11th Roland Garros title, while Simona Halep will be looking to finally win her maiden Grand Slam title.
Check out our Roland Garros guides, relieve some of the biggest defeats and triumphs of the past, and of course share your pictures, videos and stories!

Roland Garros visitor’s guide:

A trip down memory lane:

1956: First time at Roland Garros for Rod Laver

1960-1969:
Portrait of Manuel Santana, first Spaniard to capture a Grand Slam title in 1961
1967: Françoise Durr defeats Lesley Turner
1969: Rod Laver defeats Ken Rosewall

1970-1979:
Portrait of 6-time Roland Garros champion Bjorn Borg
Portrait of Adriano Panatta, the only player to beat Bjorn Borg at Roland Garros
1978: Virginia Ruzici defeats Mima Jausovec
1978: Bjorn Borg defeats Guillermo Vilas
Roland Garros 1978 in pictures

1980-1989:
1982: At the request of Monsieur Wilander
1982: first Grand Slam for Mats Wilander
1983: Yannick Noah defeats Mats Wilander
1984 French Open: Ivan Lendl defeats John McEnroe
1985 French Open: Chris Evert defeats Martina Navratilova
Roland Garros 1985: Mats Wilander defeats Ivan Lendl
Roland Garros 1988: bold Leconte swept aside by a Mats for all surfaces
Portrait of Natasha Zvereva, 1988 runner-up
Portrait of Arantxa Sanchez, 1989 French Open champion
Portrait of Michael Chang, 1989 French Open champion

1990-1999:
1990 French Open: Opposites attract, Gomez defeats Agassi
Roland Garros 1990: Defending champion Sanchez loses in the first round
Roland Garros 1990: Edberg and Becker lose in the first round
1991 French Open 3RD: Michael Chang defeats Jimmy Connors
1991 French Open final: Jim Courier defeats Andre Agassi
1996: An unflinching Edberg causes a grand upset
Roland Garros 1996: Pete Sampras run through the semi-finals
1997: Going ga-ga over Guga
Steffi Graf – Martina Hingis Roland Garros 1999

2000-2009:
2000: Mary Pierce finds peace and glory
2004: Coria vs Gaudio: the egotist vs the underdog
2005: Rafael Nadal defeats Mariano Puerta
2006: Nadal defeats Federer, wins second Roland Garros title

2010-2017:
A look back at Roland Garros 2011
A look back at Roland Garros 2014
A look back at Roland Garros 2015
3 days at Roland Garros 2017: Rafa, Andy, Petra and more

Pictures and Recaps:

Fashion and gear:

Polls:

Who will win Roland Garros 2018?

  • Rafael Nadal (79%, 15 Votes)
  • Someone else (11%, 2 Votes)
  • Sascha Zverev (11%, 2 Votes)
  • Grigor Dimitrov (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Marin Cilic (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Juan Martin del Potro (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dominic Thiem (0%, 0 Votes)
  • John Isner (0%, 0 Votes)
  • David Goffin (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Pablo Carreno Busta (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Kevin Anderson (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 19

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Who will win Roland Garros 2018?

  • Simona Halep (35%, 6 Votes)
  • Elina Svitolina (24%, 4 Votes)
  • Someone else (18%, 3 Votes)
  • Garbine Muguruza (6%, 1 Votes)
  • Caroline Garcia (6%, 1 Votes)
  • Petra Kvitova (6%, 1 Votes)
  • Jelena Ostapenko (6%, 1 Votes)
  • Karolina Pliskova (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Caroline Wozniacki (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Venus Williams (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Sloane Stephens (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 17

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France vs Belgium Davis Cup final

Three years after the France vs Switzerland final, the Pierre Mauroy stadium in Lille hosts a final between two neighbours: France and Belgium. It was my third Davis Cup final in 3 years, and once again a rollercoaster of emotions. Read my recap here:

Davis Cup semifinal: France vs Serbia

Enjoy my recap of the France vs Serbia semifinal: