Get behind the scenes at Roland Garros – part 2

Check out Get behind the scenes at Roland Garros – part 1

Ladies locker room:

The highlight of the tour is when you get to go inside the ladies dressing room. But you might be surprised at how small the locker rooms are:

Roland Garros

Roland Garros

Roland Garros


Mens and ladies locker rooms are similar but the ladies locker room has a little particularity.
6-time French Open champion Steffi Graf always insisted on using locker #19 and after retirement, the Roland Garros direction honored Graf by offering her the door to her locker and by retiring that number as well. Locker #19 was replaced by #”18bis”:

Roland Garros

If I remember well, Nadal‘s locker room is number 159 and Federer number 201.

From the players’ lounge to the Center Court corridor:

Roland Garros

Roland Garros

Roland Garros

Roland Garros

Roland Garros

Court Philippe Chatrier:

The Court Philippe Chatrier was built in 1928 as Roland Garros’s centerpiece and remains its principal venue, seating 14,840 spectators (reduced from 15,166 in 2010 to accommodate new press boxes).
The stadium was known simply as “Court Central” until 1998, when it was renamed for the long-time president of the Fédération Française de Tennis (FFT) who helped restore tennis as a Summer Olympics sport in 1988.

The four main spectator grandstands are named for les Quatre Mousquetaires (“Four Musketeers”) — Jacques “Toto” Brugnon, Jean Borotra (the “Bouncing Basque”), Henri Cochet (the “Magician”), and René Lacoste (the “Crocodile”) — who dominated men’s tennis in the 1920s and ’30s.

Roland Garros

Roland Garros

Roland Garros

Roland Garros

Roland Garros

Roland Garros

Roland Garros - Court Philippe Chatrier

Roland Garros - Court Philippe Chatrier

Roland Garros - Court Philippe Chatrier

Roland Garros - Court Philippe Chatrier

Roland Garros - Court Philippe Chatrier

Roland Garros - Court Philippe Chatrier

Roland Garros - Court Philippe Chatrier

Roland Garros - Court Philippe Chatrier

All in all, I must say the visit is quite disappointing, it lasts just under an hour and you only get to see the womens locker room, the press center and the Court Philippe Chatrier.
If you’re a die-hard tennis fan you won’t learn anything new BUT you get to see players only zone like the locker rooms.

You can combine the guided tour with a visit to the Tenniseum (the tennis museum). For more infos about bookings, prices and so on, check out the official website of the Museum.

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