Jelena Jankovic

Jelena Jankovic

Jelena Jankovic

Jelena Jankovic

Jelena Jankovic

Jalena Jankovic

Jelena Jankovic

Jelena Jankovic

Jelena Jankovic

Photo credit: mrenzaero

Eugenie Bouchard

The Canadian reached the semifinals at Charleston after victories over Alla Kudryavtseva, Venus Williams and Jelena Jankovic. She lost to Andrea Petkovic in three tight sets.

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard

Photo credit: mrenzaero

Belinda Bencic

6-1 7-5 victory for Swiss Belinda Bencic who then made her way through the first semifinals of her young career.

Maria Kirilenko

Belinda Bencic

Belinda Bencic

Belinda Bencic

Maria Kirilenko

Maria Kirilenko

Maria Kirilenko

Maria Kirilenko

Photo credit: mrenzaero

Lucie Safarova

The Czech beat Johanna Larsson, Virginie Razzano and Sam Stosur, but lost to future champion Andrea Petkovic in quarterfinals.

Lucie Safarova

Lucie Safarova

Lucie Safarova

Lucie Safarova

Lucie Safarova

Lucie Safarova

Lucie Safarova

Lucie Safarova

Lucie Safarova

Lucie Safarova

Lucie Safarova

Lucie Safarova

Photo credit: mrenzaero

Sam Stosur

Winner in Charleston in 2010, Sam Stosur was beaten in the third round by Lucie Safarova this year. The 2011 US Open champion’s season has been mediocre so far and she could drop out of the top 20 for the first time in years.

Enjoy a few pictures of Sam practising:

Sam Stosur

Sam Stosur

Sam Stosur

Sam Stosur

Sam Stosur

Sam Stosur

Sam Stosur

Sam Stosur

Sam Stosur

Photo credit: mrenzaero

Last Sunday in Miami, Martina Hingis captured her 38th doubles title, her first. 17 years ago in Miami she was crowned the new Queen of tennis. Between those two dates? Lots of highs and lows, trophies and retirements.

Summary of an article published in French sports daily L’Equipe, translated by Tennis Buzz:

By sweeping Monica Seles in final at Key Biscayne 6-2 6-1 in only 44 minutes, Martina Hingis reached the number one ranking at age 16 1/2. A record of precocity that still stands to this day.
Surpassed in all areas of the game, Monica Seles didn’t know how to counter Martina Hingis’ tactical intelligence. The stronger she hit the ball, the quicker it came back at her.

Despite her precocity, her accession to the top was ineluctable, scheduled a long time ago. Scheduled since her birth on September 30, 1980 in Kosice in the then Czechoslovakia? Perhaps not, but her mother Melanie Molitor put a lot of effort for her daughter to succeed. This former good player named her daughter Martina in honor of Martina Navratilova and put her on tennis courts at the age of 3. Two years later she entered her first tournament and in 1987 mother and daughter exiled in Switzerland.

Her progress and exceptional talent attracted agents, sponsors and medias and she hasn’t deceived them. She became junior world champion in 1994 and turned pro the same year.
Her arrival on the circuit at such an early age was criticized by many people who feared Hingis would follow the same path as troubled teen prodigy Jennifer Capriati.

In 1996, Hingis reached the quarterfinals at the Australian Open and the semifinals at the US Open (loss to Graf 5-7 3-6) and finished her season with another loss to Steffi Graf in the Masters final at Madison Garden 0-6 in the fifth set.
1997 was her biggest year (71 wins, 5 defeats). She captured her first Grand Slam title in Melbourne against Mary Pierce and also won in Sydney, Tokyo, Paris, Key Biscayne and Hilton Head. And just before the clay court tournament in Hamburg she fell off a horse. Injured, she didn’t play any clay court tournament before Roland Garros, where she lost the final to Iva Majoli.
She then won at Wimbledon (victory over Jana Novotna 2-6 6-3 6-3) and the US Open (victory over Venus Williams 6-0 6-4).
Even though she won two more Grand Slam titles after this fantastic 1997 season (Australian Open in 1998 and 1999), the Swiss was no longer as dominant when approaching the 2000s.
Overpowered by the Williams sisters and bothered by recurring injuries, she dropped out of the top 10 at the end of 2002, for the first time since 1995. She announced her retirement in May 2003, at only 22, after 209 weeks at the top ranking.

She came back in 2006, reaching the quarterfinals at the Australian Open and Roland Garros but in 2007 she tested positive to cocaine at Wimbledon. Suspended for two years by the ITF, she retired again.
Since then she came back to the courts to coach or play a few doubles tournaments, but she was also often on the front page of gossip magazines.