Roger Federer, Laver Cup 2018


The third edition of the Laver Cup will take place in Geneva, Switzerland, from 20 to 22 September 2019. Here’s all you need to know to buy tickets to this Europe vs rest of the World team competition.

The competition

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The competition pits 6 European players against 6 players from the rest of the world. Tennis legends Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe serve as captain, Thomas Enqvist and Patrick McEnroe as vice captains.
The event is played over 3 days: each day 4 matches are played, 3 singles and a doubles. Each win is worth one point on Friday, 2 on Saturday and 3 on Sunday. Matches are played in the best of 3 sets, with a 10-point match tiebreaker in the third.
The winning team must reach 13 points. In case of a tie, a doubles match is played as a regular set to determine the winner.

Created by Roger Federer‘s management company TEAM8, former Brazilian player Jorge Paulo Lemann and Tennis Australia, the Laver Cup is intended to be the Ryder Cup of tennis. But keep in mind, it is just – contrary to what Federer wants you to believe – a star-studded exhibition, with no sporting interest; a way to make easy money for the players, the occasion to watch the biggest stars of the game for the spectators.

The tickets

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Presale tickets

The Laver Cup Insider Pre-Sale will occur on February 5 from 10am to 11:59pm CET. If you registered on the Laver Cup website, you will receive an email the morning of the pre-sale with a link to purchase tickets and a pre-sale code.

Multi-session tickets

A multi-session ticket will give you access to all five sessions (over three days) at the Laver Cup: Friday: day and night sessions, Saturday: day and night sessions and Sunday: day session. The price of a multi-session ticket starts at CHF 250 (€220). Multi-session tickets go on sale on February 8, 2019 at 10am (CET) online via Ticketcorner or by phone at +41 0900 800 800.

Single tickets

A limited number of single session tickets will be available at a later date, not announced yet. Prices will start at CHF 25 (€22).

Hospitality packages

Hospitality packages are also available starting at CHF 2,600 (€2,300). More details on the official website.

Travel packages

The Laver Cup partnered with Steve Furgal’s International Tennis Tours and Faberg Tour Experience to propose Travel packages including multi-session tickets, hotel, dinners… More details on their website.

A few more things to know:
– there is a 6 ticket limit per purchaser
– there are no discounts for children
– wheelchair seats are only available for purchase via the Ticketcorner ticket hotline, +41 0900 800 800
– all tickets for Laver Cup 2019 will be in the form of a ‘Fan Ticket’. Customers will not have the option to print at home.

Photo credit: Christian Cresante

Read more:
Laver Cup 2018: Team Europe rules again

Dominic Thiem Roland Garros outfit

It’s that time of the year again, Roland Garros is just around the corner! Rafa Nadal will go for the undecima, a mind-blowing 11th Roland Garros title, while Simona Halep will be looking to finally win her maiden Grand Slam title.
Check out our Roland Garros guides, relieve some of the biggest defeats and triumphs of the past, and of course share your pictures, videos and stories!

Roland Garros visitor’s guide:

A trip down memory lane:

1956: First time at Roland Garros for Rod Laver

1960-1969:
Portrait of Manuel Santana, first Spaniard to capture a Grand Slam title in 1961
1967: Françoise Durr defeats Lesley Turner
1969: Rod Laver defeats Ken Rosewall

1970-1979:
Portrait of 6-time Roland Garros champion Bjorn Borg
Portrait of Adriano Panatta, the only player to beat Bjorn Borg at Roland Garros
1978: Virginia Ruzici defeats Mima Jausovec
1978: Bjorn Borg defeats Guillermo Vilas
Roland Garros 1978 in pictures

1980-1989:
1982: At the request of Monsieur Wilander
1982: first Grand Slam for Mats Wilander
1983: Yannick Noah defeats Mats Wilander
1984 French Open: Ivan Lendl defeats John McEnroe
1985 French Open: Chris Evert defeats Martina Navratilova
Roland Garros 1985: Mats Wilander defeats Ivan Lendl
Roland Garros 1988: bold Leconte swept aside by a Mats for all surfaces
Portrait of Natasha Zvereva, 1988 runner-up
Portrait of Arantxa Sanchez, 1989 French Open champion
Portrait of Michael Chang, 1989 French Open champion

1990-1999:
1990 French Open: Opposites attract, Gomez defeats Agassi
Roland Garros 1990: Defending champion Sanchez loses in the first round
Roland Garros 1990: Edberg and Becker lose in the first round
1991 French Open 3RD: Michael Chang defeats Jimmy Connors
1991 French Open final: Jim Courier defeats Andre Agassi
1996: An unflinching Edberg causes a grand upset
Roland Garros 1996: Pete Sampras run through the semi-finals
1997: Going ga-ga over Guga
Steffi Graf – Martina Hingis Roland Garros 1999

2000-2009:
2000: Mary Pierce finds peace and glory
2004: Coria vs Gaudio: the egotist vs the underdog
2005: Rafael Nadal defeats Mariano Puerta
2006: Nadal defeats Federer, wins second Roland Garros title

2010-2017:
A look back at Roland Garros 2011
A look back at Roland Garros 2014
A look back at Roland Garros 2015
3 days at Roland Garros 2017: Rafa, Andy, Petra and more

Pictures and Recaps:

Fashion and gear:

Polls:

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View from Montmartre, Paris

Discover our new series: Travel guides for tennis fans. And just in time for Roland Garros, check out our Paris travel guide.

Next travel guides should be Lille (France) and Antwerp (Belgium). In the mean time, follow our Roland Garros coverage.

Borotra Cup 2017

Since 1975, Le Touquet, in Northern France, has been hosting the 16&Under Boys Summer Cup aka the Borotra Cup, and has welcomed players like Yannick Noah in 1977, Mats Wilander in 1980, Richard Gasquet and Jo Tsonga in 2001, Rafael Nadal in 2002 and Novak Djokovic in 2003.
The event brings together the best 8 European teams, and acts as the European regional qualifying competition for the Junior Davis Cup.

I spent a few days in Le Touquet to attend the event last August. I did enjoy the tennis and the city, and plan to attend again in 2018, here’s my recap:

Roland Garros 2016

You plan to attend the 2019 French Open? Here’s my guide to help you buy tickets for Roland Garros, the second Slam of the season. If you have any question, feel free to ask below, I’ll do my best to answer.

The events

Serena Williams, Roland Garros 2015

Qualifyings – 20 to 24 May 2019

Tickets give access to the entire public area within the stadium. Courts 6 to 18 have unreserved seating and are open to all. Court Suzanne Lenglen is also open to all spectators to watch players from the main draw practising before the tournament starts. (Check out my report from the 2017 qualifyings: 3 days at Roland Garros: Rafa, Andy, Petra and more).

Roland Garros Kids’ Day – 25 May 2019

Roland Garros Kids’ Day is a charity event, devoted to fund raising for charitable organisations. On Kids’ Day, exhibition matches are scheduled on the three main courts, with plenty of other activities and practice sessions on the other courts and throughout the stadium.

French Open – 26 May to 9 June 2019

Since 2006 the French Open has started on a Sunday, that means the first round is played over three days from Sunday to Tuesday. Every other round is played over two days. Unlike the Australian and US Opens, there is no night session, only a day session.

Legends Trophy – 4 to 9 June 2019

The Legends Trophy (Trophée des Légendes) brings together twenty-four of history’s greatest champions, grouped according to age in the two men’s draws, and twelve former women’s tennis stars. Matches are played on court 1 and court Suzanne Lenglen during the second week of the French Open and can be watched by holders of outside courts tickets.

Wheelchair tennis tournament – 6 to 8 June 2019

The wheelchair tennis tournament is held during the second week of the French Open. All wheelchair tennis matches can be watched by holders of outside courts tickets.

Check out the provisional schedule.

The courts

Court Philippe Chatrier, Roland Garros 2015
Tickets for show courts (Philippe Chatrier, Suzanne Lenglen, Simonne Mathieu) give you a reserved seat on one of the three main courts and access to the outside courts; there is no allocated seat on the outside courts, seating is on a first come first served basis.

Court Philippe Chatrier

Court Philippe Chatrier was built in 1928 as Roland Garros’s centerpiece and remains its principal venue, seating 14,840 spectators. The stadium was known simply as “Court Central” until 1998, when it was renamed for Philippe Chatrier, the long-time president of the Fédération Française de Tennis (FFT) who helped restore tennis as a Summer Olympics sport in 1988.

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Court Suzanne Lenglen

The secondary Roland Garros stadium with a capacity of 10,068 spectators, the court Suzanne Lenglen was built in 1994. Suzanne Lenglen, born in 1899, was the first female tennis celebrity and one of the first international female sport stars, named La Divine (the divine one) by the French press.

Court Suzanne Lenglen Roland Garros

Court Simonne Mathieu

Court Simonne Mathieu replaces the “Bullring” court number one. Semi-sunken and surrounded by four greenhouses which will contain flora from four different continents, this new court is the venue’s third show court (5,000 seats). The Allée des Serres will link the new court to the historic site and provide an area for spectators to relax and stroll.

Outside courts

Courts 3 to 18. Outside courts and have been the scene of some stunning French Open upsets in the past. In the early rounds of the tournament, outside courts are also the place to be to watch the top players practicing.

The tickets

Novak Djokovic, Roland Garros 2015

Individual tickets

Single all day tickets: Allow a reserved seat on one of the show courts (Chatrier, Lenglen and Court 1) and/or unlimited access to the outside courts. From €32.

For the men’s semifinals, tickets are purchased per semi-final. You will need two tickets if you wish to attend both semi-finals.

Multi day passes

Multi-day passes available:
– week end: Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 June. From €200 for 2 days on Lenglen, from €225 on Chatrier.
– semifinals: Thursday 6 and Friday 7 June. From €265.
– finals: Saturday 8 and Sunday 9 June. From €295.

Premium packages

All Premium packages include one ticket to the Court Philippe-Chatrier or Suzanne-Lenglen and dedicated services: lounges, dining, hotels … Premium ticket sales open on March 6. More details on the official website.

Booking limits

– 4 tickets for the main courts over the entire tournament.
– 12 tickets for the outside courts over the entire tournament
– no limit for qualifyings or Roland Garros Kids’ Day

How to order tickets

Court Chatrier, Roland Garros 2015

Keep in mind that there are no ticket sales at the stadium itself before or during tournament. All bookings have to be made before the event. The tickets sell out really fast, so you better be prepared.

There are only 2 ways to legally buy tickets:
– the official Roland Garros website
– official French Open agencies that propose exclusively VIP tickets and corporate hospitality offers. You can find the complete list here.

Roland Garros website

Ticket sales open to the general public on March 20. Tickets are sold on a first come first served basis, so check out the website in advance to plan what days and courts you would like tickets for.

The e-tickets need to be printed and will be scanned at the entrance gate of the stadium, where a pass will be printed in the name of the ticketholder. These will be checked against an ID to enter the stadium.

From 17 April, you can also resell tickets via Roland Garros website and buy tickets up until the day of the event, depending on their availability.

Last minute tickets will be put on sale on 7 May.

Tips to order your French Open tickets

– create your account in advance
– tickets are sold on a first come first served basis, so check out the website in advance to plan what days and courts you would like tickets for
– write down the tickets you want to order
– check out the booking limits
– no need to try to log in at midnight on the first day, tickets sale open at 10am Paris time (9am GMT)
– don’t refresh your browser page, you would only lose your place in the queue
– if you didn’t get the tickets you wanted, try again from 17 April

If you manage to get tickets and want to share your pictures and stories on Tennis Buzz, please leave a comment below.