Tomas Berdych unveils his Roland Garros 2016 outfit

Tomas Berdych, who switched from H&M to adidas earlier this year, unveiled his black and white zebra outfit for Roland Garros on instagram. He will wear these new designs by Yohji Yamamoto for adidas Y-3:

Tomas Berdych Roland Garros 2016 outfit

Tomas Berdych Roland Garros 2016 outfit

Stay tuned for more Roland Garros 2016 coverage on Tennis Buzz.

Roland Garros FAQs

Enqvist and Moya, Roland Garros 2014

If you have any question not answered below, please leave a comment, we’ll do our best to answer.

How to get Roland Garros tickets?

There are only 2 ways to legally buy tickets:
– the official Roland Garros website
– official French Open agencies that propose exclusively VIP tickets and corporate hospitality offers. You can find the complete list here.

Read our article How to buy French Open tickets.

When do French Open tickets go on sale?

Ticket sales open to the general public on March 22. Premium packages are available for sale since March 1st.

What do qualifyings tickets give access to?

It gives you access to courts 6 to 18. On Thursday and Friday you can also watch practice sessions on court Suzanne Lenglen.

What do Philippe Chatrier tickets give access to?

Philippe Chatrier tickets give you an allocated seat on court Chatrier, and access to outside courts (no allocated seat).

What do Grounds Passes give access to?

Grounds Passes give you access to all courts except Philippe Chatrier, Suzanne Lenglen, or Court 1. There is no allocated seat, seating is on a first come first served basis.

What is the Roland Garros Kids Day?

Previously known as Benny Berthet Day, Roland Garros Kids Day is a charity event, devoted to fund raising for charitable organisations. On the eve of the tournament’s opening day, tennis stars are invited to take part in one set exhibition matches. So, for 20 euros, you can watch some of the top players in action and help a good cause!

When will the draw be published?

Friday 27, around 12.

How to get to Roland Garros Stadium?

The easiest way to get to Roland Garros is by public transport. The closest subway stations are porte d’Auteuil and Boulogne-Jean-Jaurès on line 10, Michel-Ange-Auteuil and Michel-Ange-Molitor on line 9.
Shuttle buses are also available for the duration of the tournament to transport ticketed passengers to and from the stadium.

What should I wear?

Casual wear and comfortable shoes. Take clothing suitable for all conditions and don’t forget a hat, sunglasses but also waterproofs.

May I bring food into the Stadium?

Yes, and you should of course, because food in the stadium is overpriced and lacks variety. You’ll also avoid queues. There are bakeries and supermarket nearby, where you can buy sandwiches, drinks… But don’t bring cans, glass bottles or bottles over 1.5l.

May I bring my camera?

Yes, sure. But camera tripods and camera lenses of more than 20 cm are not allowed. Don’t forget to charge your camera battery and bring extra memory cards.

What happens if it rains?

Roland Garros doesn’t have any courts with roofs, so when it rains, play stops. There isn’t a lot of covered space to hide. If play has lasted less than two hours over the entire day, you may be eligible for a refund.

Where to find the schedule of play?

The schedule of play is released each evening and is posted on the official website as soon as it is made available. It is also displayed next to the big screens on Court Suzanne Lenglen and Court number 1. Grab a free copy of the daily Roland Garros newspaper and have a look at who is playing where.

Do they really verify the name on the ticket at the entrance to the stadium?

Yes! That’s how it works:
– you first have to scan the barcode of your ticket
– collect your countermark ticket
– show your countermark ticket and proof of identity with a picture (passport or ID card) to the steward
– the steward will check that the name shown on your proof of identity matches with the name on the countermark ticket
– when you enter a show court, you have to show your countermark ticket again, so don’t lose it!

Can I leave the grounds and come back later?

No! Any exit is final.

Who was Roland Garros?

Not a tennis player, but a French national hero who perished in World War I. Roland Garros was a pioneer aviator who made the first solo flight across the Mediterranean Sea. He was killed in aerial combat in 1918.

A few more tips to enjoy your day at Roland Garros:
– arrive early: in accordance with the Vigipirate plan, you have to go through a security checkpoint before arriving at your gate
– bring your own food and drinks
– pick up a free copy of the daily Roland Garros newspaper: it contains a map of the grounds and the order of play
– scour the practice courts: you may watch your favorite player hit balls for an hour
– watch a match on the big video screens just outside of Court Suzanne Lenglen, and court 1

Please leave a comment below if you have any question, I’ll answer the best I can.

Serena Williams, Roland Garros 2015

Le guide complet pour vous aider à acheter des billets pour Roland Garros. Si vous avez des questions, n’hésitez pas à laisser un commentaire, je ferai de mon mieux pour y répondre!

Les événements Roland Garros

Roger Federer

Qualifications du 22 au 26 mai 2017

Les billets permettent l’accès aux courts 6 à 18, sur lesquels se déroulent les matchs de qualification, mais aussi au court Suzanne Lenglen sur lequel les meilleurs joueurs s’entraînent avant le tournoi.

La journée des enfants samedi 28 mai

La traditionnelle journée caritative (anciennement appelée la journée Benny Berthet) a lieu la veille du tournoi. Les trois courts principaux accueillent des matchs exhibitions. Des entraînements et diverses animations sont aussi programmés sur les courts annexes.

Roland Garros du 29 mai au 11 juin

Depuis 2006, le tournoi commence un dimanche, le premier tour s’étale donc sur 3 jours, du dimanche au mardi. Les autres tous se jouent sur 2 jours. Contrairement à l’Open d’Australie et l’US Open, il n’y a pas de session de nuit, uniquement une session journée. Le calendrier prévisionnel est disponible ici.

Trophée des Légendes du 7 au 11 juin

Le Trophée des Légendes rassemble 24 anciennes gloires du tennis (hommes et femmes) qui s’affrontent en double. Les matchs se disputent sur les court Suzanne Lenglen et numéro lors de la deuxième semaine du tournoi.

Tennis en fauteuil

Les matchs du tournoi Tennis en Fauteuil se déroulent sur les courts annexes du 8 au 10 juin.

Les courts

Court Philippe Chatrier

Les billets pour les courts principaux (Philippe Chatrier, Suzanne Lenglen, court numéro 1) donnent l’accès aux courts annexes. Les places sont numérotées sur les courts principaux, sur les courts annexes le placement est libre: premier arrivé, premier assis!

Court Philippe Chatrier

Bâti en 1928 pour accueillir la Coupe Davis, il peut accueillir 14 840 spectateurs. Anciennement nommé Court Cental, il a été renommé en 2001 Court Philippe Chatrier, en l’honneur de l’ancien président de la Fédération Internationale de Tennis.

Plan_CourtPC

Court Suzanne Lenglen

Le 2ème court principal, construit en 1994 peut contenir 10 068 spectateurs. Suzanne Lenglen, née en 1899, surnommée La Divine par la presse française, est considérée comme la première star internationale du tennis.

Court Suzanne Lenglen Roland Garros

Court numéro un

Surnommé l’arène en raison de sa forme circulaire, le court 1 (3 800 places) sera malheureusement détruit dans le cadre des travaux de modernisation du stade.

Court 1 Roland Garros

Courts annexes

Les courts annexes sont souvent le théâtre de victoires surprises. Lors des premiers tours, il est possible d’y voir les champions s’entraîner. La capacité totale des courts annexes est de 8 590 places.

Les tickets

Court Philippe Chatrier, Roland Garros

Tickets à l’unité

Tickets journée: le billet classique qui donne l’accès au court de votre choix (Chatrier, Lenglen ou Court 1) et/ou aux courts annexes. A partir de 20€ pour les courts annexes, de 50€ pour le Chatrier.

Visiteurs du soir du 22 au 30 mai: permet l’accès à partir de 17h. Réservez vos tickets à partir de 17h la veille du jour souhaité. A partir de 12€.

Pass multi journées

Les pass offrent des meilleurs prix que les billets achetés à l’unité. Les pass disponibles:
– qualifications: du lundi 22 au vendredi 26 mai, 70€.
– week end: samedi 3 et dimanche 4 juin. A partir de 200€ pour les 2 jours sur le Lenglen, à partir de 225€ pour le Chatrier.
– demi-finales: jeudi 8 et vendredi 9 juin. A partir de 225€.
– finales: samedi 10 et dimanche 11 juin. A partir de 270€.

Offres premium

Les offres premium comprennent un ticket pour le Court Philippe Chatrier ou Suzanne Lenglen ansi que certains services: loges, repas, hotels … Plus d’infos sur le site officiel.

Limites de commande

– 1 commande/paiement par personne.
– 4 tickets pour les courts principaux par personne sur l’ensemble du tournoi. 2 billets maximum pur les 9 et 11 juin combinés.
– 12 tickets pour les courts annexes sur l’ensemble du tournoi.
– aucune limite pour les qualifications et la journée des enfants

Comment acheter vos tickets

Carlos Moya

Il n’y a aucune vente de billets sur place avant ou pendant le tournoi (sauf pour les qualifications). Attention, les billets s’écoulent très rapidement.

Il n’y a que 2 moyens légaux d’acheter des billets:
– le site officiel Roland Garros
– les agences officielles qui proposent uniquement des offres packagées (billets + prestations). La liste complète ici.

Site officiel Roland Garros

La billetterie grand public ouvre le 22 mars. Les billets s’écoulent très rapidement, je vous conseille de vous préparer un peu à l’avance pour le jour J!

Tous les billets commandés sur le site sont des e-billets strictement nominatifs, vous avez jusque la veille pour attribuer à chaque e-billet les nom et prénom du bénéficiaire. Attention, les cartes d’identité sont vérifiées à l’entrée du stade!

A partir du 13 d’avril, vous pourrez aussi acheter et vendre vos tickets sur le site officiel de Roland Garros.

Quelques conseils

– créez votre compte à l’avance ou vérifiez que vos identifiants fonctionnent
– préparez vous! Allez sur le site officiel, notez les tickets qui vous intéressent, les prix…
– attention aux limitations d’achat: 1 seule commande par carte bancaire par personne
– l’an dernier, la billetterie a ouvert à 10h le premier jour
– ne rafraîchissez pas la page de votre navigateur, vous perdriez votre place dans la queue
– si vous n’avez pas réussi à acheter vos billets souhaités, réessayez à partir du 13 avril.

Roland Garros 2016

Here’s my guide to help you buy tickets for Roland Garros, the second Slam of the season. If you have any question, feel free to ask below, I’ll do my best to answer.

The events

Serena Williams, Roland Garros 2015

Qualifyings – 22 to 26 May 2017

Tickets give access to the entire public area within the stadium. Courts 6 to 18 have unreserved seating and are open to all. Court Suzanne Lenglen is also open to all spectators to watch players from the main draw practising before the tournament starts. (Check out my report from last year’s qualifyings here).

Roland Garros Kids’ Day – 28 May 2017

Roland Garros Kids’ Day is a charity event, devoted to fund raising for charitable organisations. On Kids’ Day, exhibition matches are scheduled on the three main courts, with plenty of other activities and practice sessions on the other courts and throughout the stadium.

French Open – 29 May to 11 June 2017

Since 2006 the French Open has started on a Sunday, that means the first round is played over three days from Sunday to Tuesday. Every other round is played over two days. Unlike the Australian and US Open, there is no night session, only a day session. The provisionnal schedule is available here.

Legends Trophy – 7 to 11 June 2017

The Legends Trophy (Trophée des Légendes) brings together twenty-four of history’s greatest champions, grouped according to age in the two men’s draws, and twelve former women’s tennis stars. Matches are played on court 1 and court Suzanne Lenglen during the second week of the French Open and can be watched by holders of outside courts tickets.

Wheelchair tennis tournament – 8 to 10 June 2017

The wheelchair tennis tournament is held during the second week of the French Open. All wheelchair tennis matches can be watched by holders of outside courts tickets.

The courts

Court Philippe Chatrier, Roland Garros 2015
Tickets for show courts (Philippe Chatrier, Suzanne Lenglen, court number one) also give access to the outside courts; you will be assigned an allocated seat for the whole day. On the outside courts, seating is on a first come first served basis, there is no allocated seat.

Court Philippe Chatrier

Court Philippe Chatrier was built in 1928 as Roland Garros’s centerpiece and remains its principal venue, seating 14,840 spectators. The stadium was known simply as “Court Central” until 1998, when it was renamed for Philippe Chatrier, the long-time president of the Fédération Française de Tennis (FFT) who helped restore tennis as a Summer Olympics sport in 1988.

Plan_CourtPC

Court Suzanne Lenglen

The secondary Roland Garros stadium with a capacity of 10,068 spectators, the court Suzanne Lenglen was built in 1994. Suzanne Lenglen, born in 1899, was the first female tennis celebrity and one of the first international female sport stars, named La Divine (the divine one) by the French press.

Court Suzanne Lenglen Roland Garros

Court One

Nicknamed the “Bullring” because of its circular shape – is a favorite among serious tennis fans because of its relatively small size ( 3,800 seats) and feeling of close proximity to the action.

Court 1 Roland Garros

Outside courts

Courts 2 to 18. Courts 2, 3 and 7 are the main outside courts and have been the scene of some stunning French Open upsets in the past. In the early rounds of the tournament, outside courts are also the place to be to watch the top players practicing.

The tickets

Novak Djokovic, Roland Garros 2015

Individual tickets

Single all day tickets: Allow a reserved seat on one the show courts (Chatrier, Lenglen and Court 1) and/or unlimited access to the outside courts. From €20 on outside courts, from €50 on Chatrier.

Evening Visitors from 28 May to 6 June: Tickets to outside courts or one of the show courts from 5pm. Pre-book your tickets from 5 pm on the evening before the day you wish to attend. From €12.

Multi day passes

Multi-day passes offer a better rate than tickets bought separately. Packs available:
– qualifyings: Monday 22 to Friday 26 May, €70.
– week end: Saturday 3 and Sunday 4 June. From €200 for 2 days on Lenglen, from €225 on Chatrier.
– semifinals: Thursday 8 and Friday 9 June. From €225.
– finals: Saturday 10 and Sunday 11 June. From €270.

Premium packages

All Premium packages include one ticket to the Court Philippe-Chatrier or Suzanne-Lenglen and dedicated services: lounges, dining, hotels … More details on the official website.

Booking limits

– 1 order and payment per person: Only one payment may be made per credit card (for the same card number). Bank e-cards or virtual credit cards shall not be accepted.
– 4 tickets for the main courts over the entire tournament. Maximum of two for 9 and 11 June combined.
– 12 tickets for the outside courts over the entire tournament
– no limit for qualifyings or Roland Garros Kids’ Day

How to order tickets

Court Chatrier, Roland Garros 2015

Keep in mind that except for qualifyings, there are no ticket sales at the stadium itself before or during tournament. All bookings have to be made before the event. The tickets sell out really fast, so you better be prepared.

There are only 2 ways to legally buy tickets:
– the official Roland Garros website
– official French Open agencies that propose exclusively VIP tickets and corporate hospitality offers. You can find the complete list here.

Roland Garros website

Ticket sales open to the general public on March 22. Tickets are sold on a first come first served basis, so check out the website in advance to plan what days and courts you would like tickets for.

The e-tickets need to be printed and will be scanned at the entrance gate of the stadium, where a pass will be printed in the name of the ticketholder. These will be checked against an ID to enter the stadium.

From mid-April, you can also resell tickets via Roland Garros website and buy tickets up until the day of the event, depending on their availability. Find out how to buy resale tickets.

Tips to order your French Open tickets

– create your account in advance
– tickets are sold on a first come first served basis, so check out the website in advance to plan what days and courts you would like tickets for
– write down the tickets you want to order
– check out the booking limits: only one order and payment per person
– no need to try to log in at midnight on the first day, tickets sale open at 10am Paris time (9am GMT)
– don’t refresh your browser page, you would only lose your place in the queue
– if you didn’t get the tickets you wanted, try again from April 13th

UPDATE: Some extra tickets will be on sale on May 10 at 10am!

If you manage to get tickets and want to share your pictures and stories on Tennis Buzz, please leave a comment below.

Read also:
Roland Garros FAQs
How to buy Roland Garros resale tickets
How to get last minute Roland Garros tickets

Billie Jean King

From Love Thirty: Three Decades of Champions, by Rex Bellamy (published in 1990)

Like Ashe, Billie Jean King had a pioneering zeal that made her an inspiring leader of many causes. If there was no crusade available, she invented one. They included her campaign for parity of prize money and draw numbers between men and women; the introduction of professional ‘team tennis’ and the concept’s expansion to other levels of the game; her famous ‘Battle of the Sexes‘ with Bobby Riggs, an occasion that had implications and effects outweighing the showbiz razzmatazz; her role in forming the Women’s Sports Foundation and re-enforcing the women’s liberation movement; and a maze of associated business ventures. For all that, King will most obviously be remembered for her supreme tally of Wimbledon titles during a span of 23 years. She began that Wimbledon saga as ‘Little Miss Moffitt’ and ended it as a self-styled ‘Old Lady’ who seemed to be part of the furniture. By that time she had graduated to the same class of all-time Grand Slam champions as Helen Wills and Margaret Court. But neither of these (nor any other woman, for that matter) matched King’s revolutionary status. consequently, because of her combined achievements on and off court, she became the most important figure in the history of women’s tennis.

King’s father, an engineer in the Long Beach fire department was an all-around athlete but had no interest in tennis. Her mother was a good swimmer and her brother Randy became a major-league baseball pitcher. When she first played tennis, at the age of 11, King used a racket borrowed from a friend. Then she popped spare nickels and dimes into a jar until she had $8, which was all she needed to buy a racket from the local sports shop. She made the most of the free lessons available in pubic parks at Long Beach and seized the chance to study celebrities in action at Los Angeles. King particularly liked the serve-and-volley style of Louise Brough and at 15 she spent three months receiving weekend tuition from another one-time US and Wimbledon champion, Alice Marble, who had a similarly aggressive game. Aspiring climbers are taught not to reduce the leverage of fingers and toes by getting too close to the rock. For different reasons, Marble warned King not to get too close to the ball.

Moffitt spent three years at Los Angeles State College, where she met a law student called Larry King. They were to marry in 1965. Meantime she was developing a liking for Wimbledon. In 1961, aged 17, the tomboyish Moffitt won the Wimbledon doubles with Karen Hantze, 18. King built rapidly on that early success and in 1963 she reached the Wimbledon singles final. But the road to full-time tennis was rather bump in those days and King as 21 before she could press the accelerator hard down and keep it there. Late in 1964 Bob Mitchell, the Melbourne businessman who had previously helped Margaret Court, offered to pay King’s way to Australia, where Mervyn Rose improved her groundstrokes and service and put her through a sharpening programme of training and practice drills. With a remodeled game and a total commitment to the circuit, King brought increasing confidence and intensity to her 1965 campaign. Court stopped her in an Australian semi-final and US final. Bueno stopped her in a Wimbledon semi-final. But King had beaten both in previous years, before Rose brought a bloom to her tennis, and thee could no longer be any doubt that the Court-Bueno duopoly of grass was not going to last much longer.
Read More

Althea Gibson

From Tennis Confidential by Paul Fein (published in 1999):

“Given the same chance as others have had, blacks would dominate our sport as they have in other sports”, asserted Arthur Ashe, tennis first black men’s champion, in 1968.

For the first half of the twentieth century, blacks had no chance to compete at, let alone dominate, world-class tournaments. A major reason for this racial discrimination was that white athletes in tennis and other sports were afraid of competing on an equal basis with blacks.

“For 120 years, white America has gone to extraordinay lengths to discredit and discourage black participation in sports because black athletes have been so successful,” Ashe wrote in a New York times column.

In the not-so-good old days, the “Whites only” signs on tennis courts didn’t refer only to clothes. To end that separate but unequal segregation and to promote the grassroots game among black Americans, the American Tennis Association was organized in 1916. Before the ATA, black players, chiefly from the Northeast, participated in invitational interstate tournaments, the first being staged in Philadelphia in 1898. But since blacks were barred from playing in United States Lawn Tennis Association – sanctioned tournaments prior to 1940, the ATA struggled for years to ovecome that towering barrier to equality.

Despite a shortage of rackets, balls, courts, topflight coaching and funds for travel, outstanding black players such as Ora Washington, Jimmie McDaniel, and Oscar Johnson Jr emerged. Washington, a superb all-around athlete, captured seven straight ATA national women’s singles titles from 1929 to 1935.
McDaniel was “the greatest black tennis player of them all,” according to Sydney Llewellyn, a self-described archivist of black tennis from New York’s Harlem neighborhood. “McDaniel was better than Ashe. He was bigger, stronger,” Llewellyn told Tennis USTA. “He was a tall lefty, maybe 6’5. He’d take etwo steps and be all over the net. He had it all. He would have won a bunch of Grand Slams somewhere along the line, if he had had the chance.”

He didn’t because his heyday, albeit an obscure one, ended in the 1940s. Johnson dubbed “the Jackie Robinson of tennis”, came closer. As a skinny seventeen-year-old from Los Angeles, he broke ground as the first black to play in and win a USLTA national tournament, the 1948 National Junior Public Parks. Five years later promoter Jack Kramer offered Johnson a pro contact, but a snapped ebow tendon prematurely finished his career.

Read More