Swiss Davis Cup

Led once again by an impressive Wawrinka, the Swiss defeat Gasquet and Benneteau 6-3 7-5 6-4. The dream to win a 10th Davis Cup slowly goes away for the French team.

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final
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Federer - Monfils, Davis Cup 2014

The pressure was on Monfils shoulders after Tsonga’s loss to Wawrinka, but Gaël delivered and beat Federer 6-1 6-4 6-3 in an electric atmosphere.

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

Thanks a lot to Miroslav for sharing his pictures and videos of the Davis Cup final between France and Switzerland. Read also:

Wawrinka and Tsonga, Davis Cup final 2014

Wawrinka defeated Tsonga in four sets 6-1 3-6 6-3 6-2 to give Switzerland a 1-0 lead.

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

2014 Davis Cup final

Photo and video credit: Miroslav

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2014 Davis Cup teams presentation

Thanks a lot to Miroslav for sharing his pictures and videos of the Davis Cup final between France and Switzerland.

First big moment of this unforgettable weekend: the teams’ presentation and the national anthems on Friday:

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1991 Davis Cup final

Extract from Hard Courts by John Feinstein

Anyone who cares about tennis had to be warmed by the performance of the French in Lyon. After retiring as a full-time player at the end of 1990, Yannick Noah was named captain of the French team. When they reached the final, they were given little chance against the US team.

Noah took a bold gamble, choosing Henri Leconte as his second singles player along with Guy Forget. Leconte had undergone his thid back operation in the summer and was thirty pounds overweight six weeks before the match. But, given a chance by Noah, he worked himself into shape and then became the hero of the final, first by beating Pete Sampras to tie things up at 1-1 on the first day (Andre Agassi had beaten Guy Forget in the opener), and then by pairing with Forget to beat Ken Flach and Robert Seguso in the doubles. That made it 2-1 and set the stage for Forget’s victory over Sampras that clinched the Cup.

It was the first time since 1932, in the days of the French Musketeers, that France had won the Cup, and the celebration the French victory set off was a stark contrast to the ho-hum-who-cares victory celebration the Americans had staged a year earlier in St. Petersburg after beating Australia.

To France, this was a crusade, not the kind of crude, win at-all-costs crusade staged by then USTA Persident Markin in 1990, but a crusade filled with hard work, self-confidence, and remarkable spirit. To the American players, it had been a chance to pick up some extra dough in perfomance bonuses and endorsement deals. Agassi (who for all his problems in ’91, emerged as a solid Davis Cup player) managed to insult the host country by complaining about the weather in Hawaii. Leave it to Andre to head for McDonald’s in the gastronomic capital of the world.