1991 US Open: Edberg's final dominance doesn't diminish Courier

By Arthur Ashe, September 10, 1991

When I see a match score such as 6-2, 6-4, 6-0, my first reaction is usually this: the winner broke serve twice in the first set, the loser regained his composure in the second set, and either the winner blew him away in the third set or the loser gave up But Jim Courier, loser to Stefan Edberg in the U.S. Open men’s singles final, is not a quitter. Never has been. He just never got the ball past the mid-court stripe. Edberg’s full-court pressure was relentless, precise and effective. The new Open champion has the best volley, best overhead smash and best backhand in the game. His strategy on all surfaces is centered on getting to the net as soon as possible. Thus he takes advantage of any opening to approach the front court. During normal baseline exchanges, Courier can expect his opponents to trade ground strokes with him until a shot lands short in the service court. But for 2 hours 2 minutes Sunday, Courier had to try more passing shots than ground strokes.

Edberg had been in the so-called “zone” (when an athlete can do no wrong) since the fourth round, when he dispatched Michael Chang in straight sets. In this mind-set, he believed he could do anything at any time. He tried shots that usually qualify as risky, and they worked.
Edberg started the match serving down the middle to crowd Courier. Several serves were so well-placed that Courier’s return was more self-defense than forehand or backhand. Courier tried moving his return position up, back, to the left, to the right. Nothing worked. There was one opening at 4-4, 15-30, Edberg serving in the second set. Called for a first-serve foot-fault, Edberg spun in a second serve to Courier’s two-handed backhand, which he nailed cross-court. From knee-high level, Edberg deftly side-spun a backhand volley just inside Courier’s forehand sideline for a clean winner. Courier just smiled the smile of resignation.
On the next point, Edberg was again called for a first-serve foot-fault. Again, he won the point at the net on the second volley. It was Courier’s last stand. He didn’t win another game.

Still, Courier has had a phenomenal year. He is reigning French Open champion and is one of two U.S. men who can presently win major championships on any surface. Andre Agassi is the other one who can, but hasn’t as yet. Although Agassi has garnered more headlines, Courier may well be the anchor in the Davis Cup semifinal against Germany in Kansas City later this month.
That match is on slow clay, so Courier will have to switch surfaces within 10 days. Germany’s Boris Becker, former world No. 1, has announced he is not playing because of a strained right thigh muscle. Agassi was on the squad that beat Australia in last year’s finals, but obviously is not in good form now. Courier will land in Kansas City next week as the No. 1 U.S. player.
Two other results of this year’s U.S. Open: Edberg will enjoy what could be a lengthy period as the best player on the planet and Jimmy Connors will bask in new-found respectability.

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